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  • Author or Editor: Janne Mattila x
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Abstract

The article discusses the ways in which the religion of the late ancient Ḥarrānian Sabians was interpreted and employed by medieval Muslim philosophers writing in Arabic. Though the Sabians were mostly known for their astral cult, and considered “pagan” by Muslim jurists and theologians, the Muslim philosophers argued that they were pious monotheists, ḥanīfs, and their religion was something that the philosophers, who held astrology in high prominence, could identify with. Writers such as al-Sarakhsī and the Brethren of Purity claimed that the Sabian religion was philosophical and monotheist and based on the views of the ancient Greek philosophers. The Sabians and their religion served the Muslim philosophers as a means of legitimizing the practice of philosophy in the Islamic world.

In: Religious Identities in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna
In: The Eudaimonist Ethics of al-Fārābī and Avicenna