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Author: Jean Lowenstamm

Abstract

Non-lexicalist theories assume a tight relationship between functional structure and exponence. A different view informs the analysis proposed in this paper. While the non-lexicalist view is endorsed, it is argued that morphemes have a life of their own and do not consistently and faithfully reflect functional architecture. Perfective Inflection in Moroccan Arabic with its standard, but nevertheless challenging restrictions on the way Number and Gender are allowed to combine is taken as a case in point. The discussion is preceded by a detailed study of the vowel system of the language and selected aspects of its templatic structure.

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Author: Jean Lowenstamm

Abstract

Biliteral roots have been, and still are controversial. Because Noam Agmon's paper, to which this note is an introduction, assumes the reality of biliteral roots, the issue is revisited. Several important arguments in support of the biliterality of C1C2C2 and C1C1C2 verbs were put forth in the course of the past thirty years. They are reviewed here, along with the criticisms they have triggered. It is concluded that the evidence weighs in favor of recognizing synchronically active biliteral roots subjected to templatic pressure. It is further suggested that a by-product of Agmon's study and findings is a time frame for the emergence of templatic morphology in the Middle East.

In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
In: Brill's Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics
Brill’s Journal of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics is a new peer-reviewed international forum devoted to the descriptive and theoretical study of Afroasiatic languages. The territory of the Afroasiatic family spans a vast area to the South of the Mediterranean, extending from the Atlantic Ocean to the Middle East and reaching deep into the heart of Africa. Some of the Afroasiatic languages have been studied for centuries, while others still remain partially or entirely undocumented.

In the course of the second half of the 20th century, the constantly increasing qualitative and quantitative contribution of Afroasiatic languages to the elaboration of linguistic theory has met with considerable attention from the linguistic community. The Journal seeks top-level contributions in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, comparative and historical linguistics. Its target audience comprises specialists in Afroasiatic languages and general linguists.The online edition offers the option to include sound and video files as well as other datafiles.

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