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In: Textual Research on the Psalms and Gospels / Recherches textuelles sur les psaumes et les évangiles

Abstract

Jenny Read-Heimerdinger illustrates the use of Exodus motifs in Luke-Acts which can be described as a dramatical transformation of parameters. The specific focus of this contribution is the attention to text-critical variations, in particular to the Codex Bezae Cantabrigiensis (D05). This aspect is usually ignored in intertextual studies. The following texts are analysed against their Exodus background: Acts 5:17–33; 12:1–17. The main results are that Exodus serves as a model for Peter’s deliverance from prison. The D05 ms of Acts is more complete and complex in terms of allusions to Exodus motifs. It uses the ancient event in a typically Jewish way, as a model to interpret the recent developments in the history of Israel.

In: The Reception of Exodus Motifs in Jewish and Christian Literature
In: Texts and Traditions
In: A Gospel Synopsis of the Greek Text of Matthew, Mark and Luke
In: A Gospel Synopsis of the Greek Text of Matthew, Mark and Luke
In: A Gospel Synopsis of the Greek Text of Matthew, Mark and Luke
In: A Gospel Synopsis of the Greek Text of Matthew, Mark and Luke
The aim of this new Gospel Synopsis is to enhance the study of the Synoptic Gospels and provide insights into the synoptic problem through a clear presentation of the Greek text. Jenny Read-Heimerdinger and Josep Rius-Camps set out the Gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke in turn, comparing each line by line with the other two.
A further innovative feature is that the text is presented according to two important Gospel manuscripts, Codex Bezae and Codex Vaticanus, rather than the usual eclectic edition of the Greek New Testament. Thus, not only are the differences between the Gospels clearly visible but also, the complexity of their relationship is more easily identified through the comparison of two divergent manuscripts representative of distinct traditions.