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In: Historical Linguistics and Philology of Central Asia
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Abstract

Unlike in Tibetan, Chinese, or Indian Studies, ritual and practice are topics yet to be explored in detail with regard to Uyghur Buddhism. Rather, the focus in Uyghur Studies so far is on making the texts accessible in editions and translations. While some genres of Old Uyghur literature—such as confession texts and tantric materials—clearly have to be understood within the framework of Buddhist rituals, the applicability of a ritual framework is not quite as obvious for other types of texts. Uyghur Buddhist texts with a clear-cut ritual setting draw heavily on the Chinese and Tibetan traditions. This paper looks at the contexts in which a ritual framing of Uyghur literature can be established (that is, festivals, visualisations, dhāraṇīs, amulets, talismans, and so on).

Open Access
In: Buddhism in Central Asia II
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Abstract

Uyghur Buddhism was deeply anchored in its Central Asian environment. The religious category of sacred space within and without the primary Uyghur settlement areas has not been investigated in great detail so far. This chapter will examine whether sacred space can be traced in the written sources, and if so, how the concept is elaborated and whether there is a specific Uyghur approach. With regard to a working hypothesis in addressing the research materials, the translated Buddhist works will most probably yield rather few results whereas inscriptions, poems and colophons are likely to provide answers to the question of whether there is a peculiar Uyghur take on sacred space.

Open Access
In: Buddhism in Central Asia I
In: Transfer of Buddhism Across Central Asian Networks (7th to 13th Centuries)
Author:

Abstract

Uyghur Buddhism was deeply anchored in its Central Asian environment. The religious category of sacred space within and without the primary Uyghur settlement areas has not been investigated in great detail so far. This chapter will examine whether sacred space can be traced in the written sources, and if so, how the concept is elaborated and whether there is a specific Uyghur approach. With regard to a working hypothesis in addressing the research materials, the translated Buddhist works will most probably yield rather few results whereas inscriptions, poems and colophons are likely to provide answers to the question of whether there is a peculiar Uyghur take on sacred space.

Open Access
In: Buddhism in Central Asia I