Abstract

This paper will examine what the Late Roman pottery evidence from Britain can tell us about the economy of the period. There is clear evidence of west and east coast trade routes in the province, as well as the persistence of a pre-Roman economy in the ‘Highland zone’ beyond the frontier. The army was a driver for the economy, but healthy local market economies were also a stimulus to growth. The southern region became particularly prosperous in the 3rd and 4th c., although the region that is now Wales does not seem to have embraced this model.

In: Late Antique Archaeology

Abstract

This paper will examine what the Late Roman pottery evidence from Britain can tell us about the economy of the period. There is clear evidence of west and east coast trade routes in the province, as well as the persistence of a pre-Roman economy in the ‘Highland zone’ beyond the frontier. The army was a driver for the economy, but healthy local market economies were also a stimulus to growth. The southern region became particularly prosperous in the 3rd and 4th c., although the region that is now Wales does not seem to have embraced this model.

In: Local Economies?

Abstract

The methodology used at Ras el Bassit is based on one developed in Britain and adapted for the large quantities of material found in the East. It is designed to allow the integration of pottery with other finds data in order to provide a complete catalogue of the artefacts recovered from an excavation in a format which can be analysed in a statistically meaningful way. Pottery is recorded by sherd families, defined by ware, with rims, handles and bases recorded by fabric type. Quantification is done by number of fragments, weight, minimum number of rims, rim equivalents and, for selected groups, base equivalent and estimated vessel equivalent. Surface deposits or residues such as sooting are also noted. Analysis is made of the overall assemblage and by selected group, usually defined by area and phase.

In: Late Antique Archaeology

Abstract

The methodology used at Ras el Bassit is based on one developed in Britain and adapted for the large quantities of material found in the East. It is designed to allow the integration of pottery with other finds data in order to provide a complete catalogue of the artefacts recovered from an excavation in a format which can be analysed in a statistically meaningful way. Pottery is recorded by sherd families, defined by ware, with rims, handles and bases recorded by fabric type. Quantification is done by number of fragments, weight, minimum number of rims, rim equivalents and, for selected groups, base equivalent and estimated vessel equivalent. Surface deposits or residues such as sooting are also noted. Analysis is made of the overall assemblage and by selected group, usually defined by area and phase.

In: Field Methods and Post-Excavation Techniques in Late Antique Archaeology
In: The European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief
In: The European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief
In: The European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief
In: The European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief
In: The European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief