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Author: Jeroen Salman
Itinerant salesmen, also called pedlars, street hawkers, hucksters and ballad singers are considered to be the most important distributors of popular printed matter in Europe between 1600 and 1850. A general assumption is that the pedlar travelling from town to countryside was strongly distinct from the role of the established booksellers in the towns, selling books to the educated and affluent buyer. The commercial position of the urban pedlars, however, is very often underestimated. In this book, therefore, the itinerant book trade is studied in an English and Dutch, urban context, leading to a new perspective on the role of the pedlars as an intermediary between the established booksellers and an extensive, socially diverse reading public.
Author: Jeroen Salman

Abstract

This article explores the possibilities of using the concept of Grub Street for the literary underground in eighteenth-century Amsterdam. The metaphorical meaning and physical appearance of Grub Street in London will be compared with the Amsterdam ‘Duivelshoek’, an area around the Botermarkt, currently known as the Rembrandtplein. A typical ‘Grub Street’ publisher and bookseller in this Devil’s Corner is Jacobus (I) van Egmont, who successfully combined the market for popular printing and political news. His network of authors and translators shows how difficult it is to make a clear distinction between real hack writers and respected playwrights or poets. The concept of ‘Grub Street’ helps us to understand the complexity of the Dutch literary underground of the first half of the eighteenth century.

In: Quaerendo
In: Pedlars and the Popular Press
In: Pedlars and the Popular Press
In: Pedlars and the Popular Press
In: Pedlars and the Popular Press
In: Pedlars and the Popular Press
In: Pedlars and the Popular Press
In: Pedlars and the Popular Press
In: Pedlars and the Popular Press