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In: The Lautsi Papers: Multidisciplinary Reflections on Religious Symbols in the Public School Classroom
In: The Lautsi Papers: Multidisciplinary Reflections on Religious Symbols in the Public School Classroom
In: The Lautsi Papers: Multidisciplinary Reflections on Religious Symbols in the Public School Classroom
In: The Lautsi Papers: Multidisciplinary Reflections on Religious Symbols in the Public School Classroom
Increasingly, debates about religious symbols in the public space are reformulated as human rights questions and put before national and international judges. Particularly in the area of education, legitimate interests are manifold and often collide. Children’s educational and religious rights, parental liberties vis-à-vis their children, religious traditions, state obligations in the area of public school education, the state neutrality principle, and the professional rights and duties of teachers are all principles that may warrant priority attention. Each from their own discipline and perspective––ranging from legal (human rights) scholars, (legal) philosophers, political scientists, comparative law scholars, and country-specific legal experts––these experts contribute to the question of whether in the present-day pluralist state there is room for state symbolism (e.g. crucifixes in classroom) or personal religious signs (e.g. cross necklaces or kirpans) or attire (e.g. kippahs or headscarves) in the public school classroom.
In: The European Court of Human Rights and the Freedom of Religion or Belief
In: Religion & Human Rights

Article 20(2) of the un’s International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (iccpr) is an odd human rights clause. It provides that “[a]ny advocacy of national, racial or religious hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility or violence shall be prohibited by law.” Accordingly, this provision does not appear to codify a fundamental right but rather a sui generis state obligation. The present article aims at providing a legal taxonomy of this international incitement clause, ultimately also answering the question as to whether, despite its unique formulation as speech prohibition, it contains a justiciable right to protection from incitement.

In: Journal of Law, Religion and State