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In: Shusterman’s Pragmatism
In: Shusterman’s Pragmatism
In: Practicing Pragmatist Aesthetics
In: Practicing Pragmatist Aesthetics

Abstract

This chapter examines Yann Toma’s short film Walk the Golden Night (silent and in color) as a detective mystery, which investigates itself by raising questions of its own philosophical self-consciousness. Abrams develops this view through comparison with Andy Warhol’s eight-hour silent black and white film Empire (1964), in which nothing happens, and which, according to Arthur Danto in “The Philosopher as Andy Warhol,” raises questions of its own philosophical self-consciousness, through its ambiguous relation to still photography, Empire being a moving picture without moving pictures.

In: Shusterman’s Somaesthetics
From Hip Hop Philosophy to Politics and Performance Art
Volume Editor:
This edited collection provides an in-depth and wide-ranging exploration of pragmatist philosopher Richard Shusterman’s distinctive project of “somaesthetics,” devoted not only to better understanding bodily experience but also to greater mastery of somatic perception, performance, and presentation. Against contemporary trends that focus narrowly on conceptual and computational thinking, Shusterman returns philosophy to what is most fundamental—the sentient, expressive, human body with its creations of living beauty. Twelve scholars here provide penetrating critical analyses of Shusterman on ontology, perception, language, literature, culture, politics, aesthetics, cuisine, music, and the visual arts, including films of his work in performance art.
In: Shusterman’s Somaesthetics

Abstract

This essay examines the integration of philosophy and photography in Richard Shusterman’s The Adventures of the Man in Gold and Philip K. Dick’s science fiction novella The Golden Man—two works that set at their center a silent golden man who is part-photography. Finding the Adventures elusive, and while, in some ways, a work of science fiction, Abrams concludes that the work’s philosophical power ultimately lies in its ability to raise questions regarding its own nature, comparable to what Arthur Danto finds in Andy Warhol’s Brillo Boxes.

In: Shusterman’s Somaesthetics