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Jing Tsu

Abstract

This article examines the discovery and appropriation of the Chinese diaspora in nationalistic and literary discourse in early 20th-century China. The overseas Chinese experience entered into the main field of vision of the Chinese intellectuals at a strategic moment at the turn of the century, when the diasporic frontier was uncovered only to be re-incorporated into the nationalistic imagination. This analysis begins with a look at Liang Qichao's ambivalent attitude toward the overseas Chinese whom he praised as national colonial heroes on the one hand, and denigrated for tarnishing China's image abroad on the other. In the context of national survival and the theory of evolution, Chinese laborers were hailed by some writers as the exception to the rule of extinction of the unfit. This representation was in no small part reinforced by literary and fictional writings about post-apocalyptic societies where the Chinese once again found their proper role of leadership and dominance over other races. After examining the hitherto largely unknown novels and stories on the subject, the discussion ends with an analysis of the 1906 novel, Icy Mountains and Snowy Seas, set in the 24th century in a brave new world near the South Pole.

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Edited by Jing Tsu and Benjamin A. Elman

The first of its kind, this collection of critical essays opens up new venues in the comparative study of science and culture by focusing on the formative decades of modern China in the late nineteenth and first half of the twentieth century. It provides a wide-ranging examination of the cultural and intellectual history of science and technology in modern China.From anti-imperialism to the technology of Chinese writing, the commodification of novelties to the rise of the modern professional scientist, new lexica and appropriations of the past, the contributors map out a transregional and global circuitry of modern knowledge and practical know-how, nationalism and the amalgamation of new social practices.
Contributors include: Iwo Amelung, Fa-ti Fan, Shen Guowei, Danian Hu, Joachim Kurtz, Eugenia Lean, Thomas S. Mullaney, Hugh Shapiro, Grace Shen, and Jing Tsu.
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Edited by Jing Tsu and Benjamin A. Elman

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Jing Tsu and Benjamin A. Elman

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Series:

Jing Tsu and Benjamin A. Elman

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Global Chinese Literature

Critical Essays

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Edited by Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang

This path-breaking collection of critical essays introduces a diverse range of approaches to open up the field of modern Chinese literature to new cross-regional, local, and global analyses. Each of the ten essays deals with a particular conceptual problem or case study of different locations and modalities of Chinese-language, or Sinophone, production. From language to music, literature to popular culture, minority politics to internal diaspora, theories of sinography to China's quest for the Nobel Prize, this volume brings together leading and new voices in the study of Chinese literature from a variety of comparative and intranational perspectives. Contributors include scholars from Asia, North America, Europe, and Southeast Asia. It is an indispensable reference for anyone interested in contemporary China and the global politics of Sinophone literature.

``This thought-provoking anthology has opened up many fascinating questions. Although its intended readership is scholars from literary studies, anyone who is interested in the interplay between language, ethnicity and identity should not miss it.``
Zhengdao Ye, The Australian National University
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Edited by Jing Tsu and David Der-wei Wang