Jinghuan Shi

Jinghuan Shi

Abstract

Yenching University, one of the most influential institutions in Chinese education in the first half of the twentieth century, also was emblematic of Sino-American cultural interchanges. Its development in the late 1910s and the 1920s coincided with a strong upsurge in national sentiment and anti-Christian movements in China. When the Communist victory and the Korean War brought patriotic anti-American feelings to a peak, the university was deeply shaken and was forced to close its doors. Forty years after its closure, Yenching’s name still arouses memories and fierce unresolved controversies. Both strong critics and defenders of the school need to include the Yenching experience in any discussion of cultural activities between the United States and China in the twentieth century. Yenching is more than a historical interlude, for the Yenching experience sheds light on issues that may influence the future of educational and cultural interactions in Sino-American relations.

Editor-in-Chief Jinghuan Shi

The International Journal of Chinese Education (IJCE) aims to strengthen Chinese academic exchange and cooperation with other countries in order to improve education research and promote education development. The journal welcomes both empirical and theoretical studies on popular and policy issues. Articles can address all China-related education disciplines, education phenomena and education problems, including comparative studies. Articles should be of interest to both scholars and advanced students, specialists and informed readers, as well as policy makers.

Editorial Information
The International Journal of Chinese Education seeks your support through submission of articles, research reports and book reviews. IJCE uses online submission. Authors should register and then submit their manuscript online via the Editorial Manager online submission system at: editorialmanager.com/ijce. Instructions for Authors (IFA) can be found here. The IFA include details on Open Access publication. Brill Open Access options can be found at www.brill.com/open. Please contact the editorial office for any questions or problems regarding IJCE or a manuscript: ijce@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn.

Empiricism and Idealism

Do We Need a Mode Shift of General Education in China?

Jinghuan Shi and Yi Lu

In recent years general education in Chinese universities has gone through rapid growth, which has led scholars to reflect on the motivations which underpin its current and future development. This paper establishes a framework based on the size of the universities together with whether the motivation is idealism or empiricism. This framework forms three typologies of general education in China, particularly from the perspective of curriculum design and student involvement. Three cases that each represent one of the three typologies are analyzed to depict the detailed characteristics. The main conclusion of the paper is that general education in its essence is an idealistic pursuit of a permanent goal, while in reality it is resource-dependent and rooted in historical conditions. China’s case studies provide a vivid example that general education reform starts with practical approaches of offering selective courses or building pilot zones and then by moderately increasing its scale and coverage, moving towards idealism across the spectrum. The key principals during the long journey are to avoid conformism, encourage innovations and maintain diversity.

Jinghuan Shi

Translator Chad Meyers

Abstract

This paper is based on the research project funded by the Ford Foundation, on Gender Analysis of the Textbooks and Teaching Materials in K-9 Schools and Informal Adults’ Literacy Learning. It first explains from the theoretical perspective, the social-cultural meaning of gender and the relationship of education (schooling) with human gender socialization. Then it gets into the real world of schools and classroom teaching (learning). By using a variety of methodologies, textbooks and interaction between teachers and student in classrooms is analyzed from the perspective of gender. It shows how gender culture is transferred and reproduced through textbook learning and interpersonal exchanges.

Shi Jinghuan, Wen Wen, Li Yifei and Chu Jing

Abstract

The paper uses macro-causal analysis combined with empirical data analysis to illustrate how Chinese scholars in higher education (he) have adapted the concept of “student engagement” and indigenize the instrument of the National Survey of Student Engagement (nsse), with the aim of revealing college teaching/learning activities and understanding the learning processes of Chinese students in he. The paper explains why and how the China College Student Survey (ccss) was developed by the research team in the Institute of Education (ioe), Tsinghua University, using the nsse as a basis, with the help of both domestic and foreign scholars. The paper analyzes data collected nationwide in 2012, under the framework of four trends influencing he in China. Cases are also studied in the paper illustrating the learning behaviors of college students, as well as the macro-level driving forces in a more general context.

Jinghuan Shi and Hamish Coates

Abstract

This paper outlines the rationales shaping the papers presented in this issue of the International Journal of Chinese (IJCE). To provide context for the contributions, it looks at policy contexts, institutional developments, major guiding research projects, and various engagement platforms. The papers are reviewed in terms of their implications for shaping the future of higher education evaluation and success.

Hamish Coates, Lu Liu and Jinghuan Shi

Abstract

In this article we introduce the five papers published in this issue of the International Journal of Chinese Education (IJCE). We begin by discussing complexities shaping the analysis of education, then turn to each paper’s nature and contributions. The article concludes by introducing revised IJCE editorial arrangements.