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KronoScope

Journal for the Study of Time

Time bears a unique and direct pertinence to all human concerns. Time is a fundamental feature of the physical universe, of the life process, of the functions of the mind, and of collective behaviour. Time is an all-pervasive, intimate and immediate part of human experience.Time has been the subject of much study and debate in the arts, the sciences, the social and behavioral sciences and the humanities.
Since 1966, the International Society for the Study of Time (ISST) has been providing a framework for an interdisciplinary dialogue about the nature of time. KronoScope, edited by an international board of scholars, carries forward the work of ISST. It offers a forum for the cross-fertilization of scholarly and scientific study about the nature of time as seen from a range of perspectives and disciplines. As a journal, it can accommodate the expanding concerns of the global community in search of understanding and meaning. KronoScope invites critical contributions from all disciplines.

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NOW AVAILABLE - Online submission: Articles for publication in KronoScope can be submitted online through Editorial Manager, please click here. Potential contributors should direct queries to the Managing Editor, see instructions for authors.
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The nature of time has haunted humankind through the ages. Some conception of time has always entered into our ideas about mortality and immortality, and permanence and change, so that concepts of time are of fundamental importance in the study of religion, philosophy, literature, history, and mythology. On one aspect or another, the study of time cuts across all disciplines. The International Society for the Study of Time has as its goal the interdisciplinary and comparative study of time. This volume presents selected essays from the 12th triennial conference of the International Society for the Study of Time at Clare College, Cambridge. The essays are clustered around themes that pertain to the constructive and destructive nature of memory in representations and manipulations of time. The volume is divided into three sections Inscribing and Forgetting, Inventing, and Commemoration wherein the authors grapple with the nature of memory as a medium that reflects the passage of time.