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A Companion to Clare of Assisi

Life, Writings, and Spirituality

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Joan Mueller

Clare of Assisi: Life, Writings and Spirituality examines Clare not merely as an obedient footnote to the friars, but as a Franciscan founder in her own right who kept primitive Franciscan ideals alive into the middle of the thirteenth century and transposed them into a woman’s key. Bringing together the best of international research, the text examines Clare’s importance within the early Franciscan milieu and her contribution to the thirteenth-century women's movement. It studies the radicalism of Clare's Franciscan choice, her life within the Monastery of San Damiano, her politicking with Agnes of Prague for the "privilege of poverty," and her uniqueness among other women in Gregory IX's Damianite ordo. Following this historical study are critical translations and literary analyses of Clare's four letters to Agnes of Prague as well as a new translation and commentary on Clare’s Forma Vitae.
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Competition and collaboration (CHAZEN editie)

Japanese Prints of the Utagawa School (CHAZEN)

Joan Mueller

The prolific Utagawa school is one of the most famous lineages of print artists in the history of Japanese woodblock prints. It was founded by Utagawa Toyoharu during the second half of the eighteenth century and remained active in Edo, present-day Tokyo, throughout the nineteenth century. During this period, Utagawa-school artists dominated virtually every genre of ukiyo-e prints, or “pictures of the floating world,” including pictures of beautiful women, prints of kabuki actors, warrior prints, erotica, and landscape pictures. Colorful, technically innovative, and sometimes defiant of government regulations, these prints documented for a popular audience the pleasures of urban life, leisure, and travel. The diverse works by Utagawa Kunisada, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Utagawa Hiroshige, and others reflected the changing social, economic, and political conditions present during the closing century of the Edo period (1615-1868) and early years of the Meiji period (1868-1912).
This 232-page groundbreaking catalogue features full-color images of more than 200 prints from the renowned Van Vleck Collection of Japanese Prints at the Chazen Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin–Madison. This collection – a number of which were once part of Frank Lloyd Wright’s personal collection of Japanese prints – is particularly noteworthy for its strong holdings of landscape prints including rare designs incorporating western perspective by the school’s founder Toyoharu. The book includes explicated entries for each work, artist biographies, and five scholarly essays about Japanese print culture and the Utagawa school.
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Competition and Collaboration

Japanese Prints of the Utagawa School

Joan Mueller

The prolific Utagawa school is one of the most famous lineages of print artists in the history of Japanese woodblock prints. It was founded by Utagawa Toyoharu during the second half of the eighteenth century and remained active in Edo, present-day Tokyo, throughout the nineteenth century. During this period, Utagawa-school artists dominated virtually every genre of ukiyo-e prints, or “pictures of the floating world,” including pictures of beautiful women, prints of kabuki actors, warrior prints, erotica, and landscape pictures. Colorful, technically innovative, and sometimes defiant of government regulations, these prints documented for a popular audience the pleasures of urban life, leisure, and travel. The diverse works by Utagawa Kunisada, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Utagawa Hiroshige, and others reflected the changing social, economic, and political conditions present during the closing century of the Edo period (1615-1868) and early years of the Meiji period (1868-1912).
This 232-page groundbreaking catalogue features full-color images of more than 200 prints from the renowned Van Vleck Collection of Japanese Prints at the Chazen Museum of Art, University of Wisconsin–Madison. This collection – a number of which were once part of Frank Lloyd Wright’s personal collection of Japanese prints – is particularly noteworthy for its strong holdings of landscape prints including rare designs incorporating western perspective by the school’s founder Toyoharu. The book includes explicated entries for each work, artist biographies, and five scholarly essays about Japanese print culture and the Utagawa school.
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Strong Women, Beautiful Men

Japanese Portrait Prints from the Toledo Museum of Art

Joan Mueller

Shin-hanga, literally meaning ‘new prints’, was the name given to a Japanese print artists’ movement in the early years of the twentieth century. It sought to revive the traditional style of Ukiyo-e woodblock prints of the Edo period (1603-1868). The connection between shin-hanga and the Toledo Museum of Art began when Yoshida Hiroshi, one of the leaders of the movement, and his artist wife met J. Arthur MacLean and Dorothy Blair, at that time connected to the John Herron Art Museum in Indianapolis. When Mr. MacLean and Miss Blair established Toledo’s Asian Art Department in 1927-28, they decided to collaborate with their friends the Yoshidas on two exhibitions of modern Japanese prints, which took place in 1930 and 1936. This book accompanies the Museum’s exhibition, Strong Women, Beautiful Men, which explores the concept of the human form in Japanese woodblock prints. Many of the works in the extensive Toledo collection deal with the genre of popular figures, such as Kabuki actors in famous roles and bijin-ga, images of beautiful women.

Contents:
• Foreword - Don Bacigalupi, Director
• Modern Japanese Prints in Toledo - Carolyn M. Putney, Curator of Asian Art
• The Changing Faces of Japanese Woodblock Prints - Laura J. Mueller
• Catalogue of Plates (50, each with brief text)
• Artist Biographies; Glossary; Brief Checklist of Exhibition; Selected Bibliography; Concordance by
• Accession Number; Index.
Artists: Nishikawa Sukenobu, Torii Kyomasu II, Torii Kiyonobu II, Suzuki Harunobu,
Ippitsusai Buncho, Torii Kiyonaga, Katsukawa Shunko, Katsukawa Shun’ei, Kitagawa Utamaro, Kikugawa Eizan, Katsushika Taito II, Katsushika Hokusai, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, Keisai Eisen, Kunisada (Toyokuni III), Toyohara Kunichika, Mizuno Toshikata, Migita Toshihide, Hashiguchi Goyo, Yoshikawa Kanpo, Ito Shinsui, Yamamura Toyonari, Miki Suizan, Natori Shunsen, Yoshida Hiroshi.
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Edited by Joan Mueller and Nancy Warren

A Companion to Colette of Corbie presents a collection of essays offering new historical and religious perspectives on the life, career, and influences of this little-studied fifteenth-century saint.
Colette of Corbie, a contemporary of Joan of Arc, established an important reform movement in the Franciscan order; founded numerous monasteries for women in Burgundy, France, and the Low Countries; and had connections with high ranking Burgundian and French noble families.
Essays in this volume draw upon many relatively unknown primary sources and add significantly to the scholarship on this important religious figure.

Contributors are: Anna Campbell, Joan Mueller, Andrea Pearson, Jane Marie Pinzino, Monique Somme, Ludovic Viallet, and Nancy Bradley Warren
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Series:

Joan Mueller and Nancy Bradley Warren

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Series:

Joan Mueller and Nancy Bradley Warren

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Series:

Joan Mueller and Nancy Bradley Warren

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Series:

Joan Mueller and Nancy Bradley Warren