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Abstract

The desirable link between the university and society justifies its inclusive approach and its social orientation. However, in practice not everyone accesses it, not everyone wants to access it and not everyone should complete their studies if they do not develop the skills of the degree that they attend. Combining equity and quality is possible and desirable, although is not achievable if the processes involved are not properly organised. In this regard, we analyse curricular, organisational and social demands of an inclusive university, focusing the attention on vulnerable groups, including the attention to personal characteristics. We also highlight normative, institutional and operational advances and challenges related to the diagnosis, the intervention and the evaluation of the results. We conclude that: (a) promoting and drive inclusive processes could be the most effective way to tackle discriminatory and exclusionary attitudes; (b) is necessary to restructuring the training institutions to guarantee the properly attention to all students and (c) occasionally, school and university exclusion is the prelude to some social exclusion trajectories.

In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
In: The Social Dimension of Higher Education in Europe
Issues, Strategies and Good Practices for Inclusion
The social dimension of higher education emphasises the need to create more flexible learning and participation pathways within higher education for all students. In recent years, several projects have been developed and research groups created that have allowed considerable progress in the promotion and monitoring of more inclusive policies in this field. However, designing and implementing programmes providing attention to vulnerable groups remains a challenge for universities. Including the most significant contributions of the European project ACCESS4ALL, the book presents conceptual aspects related to the inclusive university, such as the quality and transitions linked to the treatment of diversity, good inclusion practices in six European countries, and a set of tools to identify dysfunctions and promote inclusion in higher education.

Contributors are: Kati Clements, Fabio Dovigo, Joaquín Gairín, Romiță Iucu, Miguel Jerónimo, Lisa Lucas, Tiina Mäkelä, Elena Marin, Saana Mehtälä, Fernanda Paula Pinheiro, David Rodríguez-Gómez, Cecilia Inés Suárez, Mihaela Stîngu and Sue Timmis.