Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 46 items for

  • Author or Editor: Joe Andrew x
  • Search level: All x
Clear All
In: Dostoevskii’s Overcoat: Influence, Comparison, and Transposition
In: Dostoevskii’s Overcoat: Influence, Comparison, and Transposition
Author:

Abstract

The final chapter considers Father Sergius. Never published in Tolstoi’s life-time, this work is often seen as, in effect, part of a trilogy of works written about 1890 which deal with sex and lust, and devil women (amongst other matters), the other two being The Kreutzer Sonata and The Devil, the latter also first published posthumously. In all three tales the male protagonist is or was a social ‘lion’, whose life is marred or even destroyed by his interaction with a ‘devil woman’. Whilst it is true that Father Sergius has many commonalities with the other two works, and shares their bleak, late-Tolstoi assessment of relations between men and women (and of humanity more generally), it is also profoundly different. This is obviously true of the key elements of plot – there is no marriage which leads inexorably to murder or suicide; more broadly it is clearly more redemptive in tone, in that the eponymous hero not merely survives without killing his devil woman or himself, but is reborn as a holy man, even if the ending is not as convincing as Tolstoi might perhaps have wished. The purpose of this chapter is to offer a rounded analysis of Father Sergius which explores these key themes of the late Tolstoi, sex, lust, relations between men and women, and the possibility of human happiness beyond if not within these relations. This analysis approaches the text using the ‘classic’ tools of a Neo-Formalist analysis, first laid down by Michael O’Toole, in his pioneering study of Chekhov’s The Student back in the 1970s. These are setting, plot (subsuming fabula and siuzhet), narrative structure, character (including point of view), all of which combine to elucidate the theme.

In: Tolstoi and the Evolution of His Artistic World
Author:

Abstract

This Introduction sets the scene for the ensuing chapters. While the following 13 chapters take a text-based approach to works by Tolstoi, the prevailing tradition in English-language criticism of his work was overwhelmingly thematic for the first hundred years. Works about Tolstoi and translations of him began right back in the 1860s, and many illustrious English and American writers and thinkers were deeply impressed by his approach to life as manifested in his artistic works. Those writing about him along these lines included Matthew Arnold, Henry James, Virginia Woolf and D.H. Lawrence. They were deeply impressed by his understanding of the ‘human condition’, and looked on him as a teacher of life. These approaches continued right through to the 1960s, when gradually over that decade and the next, new attitudes and methods emerged, including structuralism, post-structuralism and feminism. This turn towards a more text-based form of criticism coincided with the launch of the Neo-Formalist Circle in 1970, and members of this group helped develop a new understanding of literature, including the works of Tolstoi. Following the overview of the first 100 years of Tolstoi criticism in English, the Introduction offers a brief summary of each of the chapters proper.

In: Tolstoi and the Evolution of His Artistic World
Author:
The present volume has as its primary aim readings, from a feminist perspective, of a number of works from Russian literature published over the period in which the ‘woman question’ rose to the fore and reached its peak. All the works considered here were produced in, or hark back to, a fairly narrowly defined period of not quite 20 years (1846-1864) in which issues of gender, of male and female roles were discussed much more keenly than in perhaps any other period in Russian literature.
The overall project is summed up by the three key words of this book’s title, narrative, space and gender, and, especially, the interconnections between them. That is, what do the way these stories were told tell us about gender identities in mid-nineteenth-century Russia? Which spaces were central to these fictional worlds? Which spaces suggested which gender identities? The discussions therefore focus on issues of narrative and space, and how they acted as ‘technologies of gender’.
This volume will be of interest to all interested in nineteenth-century Russian literature, as well as students of gender, and of the semiotics of narrative space.
Essays to Celebrate Twenty Years of the Neo-Formalist Circle
Author:
In: Turgenev and Russian Culture
In: Turgenev and Russian Culture
In: Turgenev and Russian Culture
In: Turgenev and Russian Culture