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Abstract

This chapter makes the case that the Globish can be construed as a “war machine” against English. Focusing on language learning in the context of Japan, it discusses why Globish has gained much attention on the archipelago. By showing how the desire for Globish expresses the tensions inherent to Japan’s unique and schizoid love-hate relationship with the world’s de facto lingua franca, English, this nuanced argument moves beyond well-rehearsed debates and critiques of the native-speaker and linguistic imperialism. The philosophical concepts of Deleuze and Guattari are used to explain how minor languages both inflect and affect major languages or dominant tongues. In addition, Guattari’s “flattening of subjectivity” enables a rethinking of the hybridity of languages and the problem of learner identity.

In: Deterritorializing Language, Teaching, Learning, and Research
Chapter 4 Deleuze and Globish

Abstract

This chapter makes the case that the Globish can be construed as a “war machine” against English. Focusing on language learning in the context of Japan, it discusses why Globish has gained much attention on the archipelago. By showing how the desire for Globish expresses the tensions inherent to Japan’s unique and schizoid love-hate relationship with the world’s de facto lingua franca, English, this nuanced argument moves beyond well-rehearsed debates and critiques of the native-speaker and linguistic imperialism. The philosophical concepts of Deleuze and Guattari are used to explain how minor languages both inflect and affect major languages or dominant tongues. In addition, Guattari’s “flattening of subjectivity” enables a rethinking of the hybridity of languages and the problem of learner identity.

In: Deterritorializing Language, Teaching, Learning, and Research
6 Pinter: Held Incommunicado on the Mobile
In: Bringing Forth a World
1 Introduction
In: Bringing Forth a World
Engaged Pedagogy in the Japanese University
Offering a critical yet constructive response to the perceived crises in tertiary foreign language education in the Japanese university, the contributors to Bringing Forth a World provide theoretical and practical solutions which together act as a prolegomena to bringing forth a world. Theirs is an ecology of contribution in liberal arts education which takes responsibility for the care for youth, and contests intellectual passivity and indifference in foreign language instruction.

The editors proffer a transformative, engaged and multidisciplinary liberal arts pedagogy, one at odds with forms of lowest common denominator, one-size-fits-all, and standardized provision. In response to the prevalent business-dominated model, they demonstrate an applied format of multiliteracy theory—one with semiotic, multimodal, feminist dimensions—which is regionally specific and better accounts for divergent forms of human expression and perception. The writers not only take account of the intellectual and mental issues in the student demographic but also in the teaching profession which suffers from widespread anxiety, job insecurity and a lack of autonomy, experimentation and innovation.

Philosophically, the contributors to this book demand a form of meaning-making which is fundamentally social and creative, and which celebrates processes of ‘becoming-other’ in-between the student and teacher that seldom, if ever, follow a predictable trajectory. It is hoped that readers will embrace the spirit of the book, pick up its philosophical gauntlet to think otherwise than prevalent standardized models of teaching and learning, and therefore will use its core tenets to experiment with different ways of educating the youth of today.
Foreword by Michael A. Peters.
A Pedagogy of Cinema is the first book to apply Deleuze’s concept of cinema to the pedagogic context. Cinema is opened up by this action from the straightforward educative analysis of film, to the systematic unfolding of image. A Pedagogy of Cinem a explores what it means to engender cinema-thinking from image. This book does not overlay images from films with an educational approach to them, but looks to the images themselves to produce philosophy. This approach to utilising image in education is wholly new, and has the potential to transform classroom practice with respect to teaching and learning about cinema. The authors have carefully chosen specific examples of images to illustrate such transformational processes, and have fitted them into in depth analysis that is derived from the images. The result is a combination of image and text that advances the field of cinema study for and in education with a philosophical intent.
In: A Pedagogy of Cinema
In: A Pedagogy of Cinema
In: A Pedagogy of Cinema
In: A Pedagogy of Cinema