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Volume Editors: Denise Bentrovato and Johan Wassermann
Emerging from the pioneering work of the African Association for History Education (AHE-Afrika), Teaching African History in Schools offers an original Africa-centred contribution to international history education research. Edited by AHE-Afrika’s founders and directors, the volume thus addresses a notable gap in this field by showcasing otherwise marginalised scholarship from and about Africa.

Teaching African History in Schools constitutes a unique collection of nine empirical studies, interrogating curriculum and textbook contents, and teachers’ and learners’ voices and experiences as they relate to teaching and learning African history across the continent and beyond. Case studies include South Africa, Kenya, Rwanda, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Cameroon and Tanzania, as well as the UK and Canada.

Contributors are: Denise Bentrovato, Carol Bertram, Jean-Leonard Buhigiro, Annie Fatsereni Chiponda, Raymond Nkwenti Fru, Marshall Tamuka Maposa, Abdul Mohamud, Sabrina Moisan, Reville Nussey, Nancy Rushohora, Johan Wassermann, and Robin Whitburn.
In: Teaching African History in Schools

Abstract

This concluding chapter fleshes out and reflects on the positionality, premises and vision underpinning this book project and the journey undertaken towards its materialisation. It thereby also retraces some of the specific contributions made by each author and their respective chapters to the goals and visions embodied in this collective project. Conceived of as a fundamentally anti-colonial and decolonising act, this project is presented as seeking to counter the coloniality of knowledge under which history education currently exists by showcasing scholarship about, from and for Africa. It is regarded as a response to the large-scale marginalisation of Afrocentric history educationists and their knowledge from the spaces in which history education knowledge is produced, a condition which both alienates those excluded and makes little sense in an African context that is hardly ever considered.

In: Teaching African History in Schools

Abstract

Since the turn of the century, debates around the teaching and representation of the re-unification of Cameroon have dominated national headlines. History education has been highly instrumental in fanning the flames of this controversy through conflicting historical interpretations. A significant aspect of this controversy is the fact that the history curriculum in the Francophone sub-system of education stipulates the teaching of re-unification at the classes de terminale, but the history textbook adopted for use at that level is largely silent on the topic. Against this backdrop, we employed qualitative content analysis and Thomas Huckin’s theory of manipulative silence to analyse the implications of silence on re-unification in a Francophone Cameroon school history textbook. The chapter is informed by a premise that what is absent from the textbook is as powerful as what is represented in it. The findings revealed that the principles of intentionality (to diminish the importance of the topic), deception and advantage as well as the socio-political sensitivity of the topic are important variables for explaining the limited textual coverage on re-unification. Situating the textbook in the bigger picture of re-unification tension supports the view of textbooks serving ideological rather than purely pedagogic functions.

In: Teaching African History in Schools