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The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in Biblical and Jewish Studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible. To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain additions and corrections, a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index, as well as an English-Aramaic index.
The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in Biblical and Jewish Studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible. To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain additions and corrections, a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index, as well as an English-Aramaic index.
Papers Read at the Tenth Joint Meeting of The Society for Old Testament Study and Het Oudtestamentisch Werkgezelschap in Nederland en België, held at Oxford, 1997
In modern literary studies intertextuality is at the centre of interest. Although the relationship between texts has always been an important aspect of Old Testament studies, especially in literary criticism, the scale of comparison has broadened, including for example the interrelationships between the First, Second and Third Isaiah, or the whole Book of the Twelve. These relatively new approaches raise a number of methodical questions which were addressed at the Tenth Joint Meeting of the British Society for Old Testament Study and the Dutch 'Oudtestamentisch Werkgezelschap', held at Oxford, 22nd to 25th July 1997. Did the ancient authors have a well-defined concept of a book? How did they relate to the literary work of their predecessors and contemporaries? Can we trace the theological motifs behind their use of other literary compositions? What does an ancient version reveal about the way it interpreted its source text?
One of the problems confronting biblical scholars in this kind of research is the lack of controllable models. Therefore it is useful to study the work of the Ugaritic chief priest Ilimilku whose three major literary compositions provide us with a unique possibility to monitor intertextual relationships in the work of one and the same ancient author. Ugaritic and other ancient Near Eastern parallels help us to understand how the Priestly writer re-interpreted the Yahwistic account of the creation of mankind. Apparently intertextuality in Israel is a phenomenon which cannot properly be understood without taking other literature from the ancient world into account.
The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in Biblical and Jewish Studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible. To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain additions and corrections, a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index, as well as an English-Aramaic index.
The bilingual (Aramaic-Hebrew) concordance to the Targum of the Prophets is the product of an international project based in the Theological University of the Reformed Churches in the Netherlands, Kampen (ThUK) and supported by the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO). With this publication a major research tool becomes available to those engaged in research in Biblical and Jewish studies.
For the first time meaningful quotations from the Targum and the Masoretic Hebrew text of the Bible are set out in parallel so that the user of the concordance can study the translation technique of the Targum in much greater detail than was hitherto possible. For comparative purposes the concordance is published per book of the Prophets. Eventually a complete concordance will become available in electronic form.
The concordance makes a wealth of largely unknown material accessible to researchers. The discovery of the presumed-lost Song of the Lamb, referred to in Rev. 15:3, by members of the editorial team vividly illustrates the importance of such a concordance to both Judaic and New Testament studies. The concordance will also be an indispensable tool for the textual criticism and the history of interpretation of the Hebrew Bible.
To facilitate consultation on the basis of the Hebrew, every concordance per book contains a Hebrew-Aramaic index. The final volume will contain a cumulative Hebrew-Aramaic index.
Publication is envisaged in a total of 21 volumes of 400-450 pages each, over a five to six-year period, as follows:
Joshua, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (1 vol.) January 1995 (AVAILABLE)
Judges, ed. Willem Smelik (Kampen University) (1 vol.), July 1995 (AVAILABLE)
1 & 2 Samuel, ed. Eveline van Staalduine-Sulman (Kampen University) (3 vols.), November 1995
Ezekiel, ed. Thomas J. Finley (Talbot School of Theology, Biola University, La Mirada, USA) (3 vols.), 1996
Isaiah, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1997
Jeremiah, ed. Floris Sepmeijer (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1997
1 & 2 Kings, ed. Bernard Grossfeld (The University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, USA) (3 vols.), 1998
The Twelve, ed. Johannes C. de Moor (Kampen University) (3 vols.), 1999
Index (1 vol.), 2000
In Old Testament exegesis a gap is widening between the adherents of the "diachronic", historical-critical approach and those who out of dissatisfaction with both the results and the methods of this "classical" approach opt for a wide variety of "synchronic" approaches. The Ninth Joint Meeting of the Dutch "Oudtestamentisch Werkgezelschap" and the British "Society for Old Testament Study", held at Kampen 28-31 August 1994, brought together partisans from both camps who engaged in a most interesting and fruitful debate on one of the major methodological issues confronting modern O.T. scholarship. This volume contains the papers read as well as some reports from the workshops. With indices of texts and subjects.
The Prophet as a Historical Person, Literary Character and Anonymous Artist
The Israelite prophets as historical persons, as literary characters and as anonymous artists. Whereas modern methods of literary analysis have brought the artistic qualities of the books of the Prophets increasingly into focus during the past century, various modes of deconstruction have made the historical prophets themselves an ever more elusive phenomenon. Passages in the Old Testament describing their work and experiences are not read as biography anymore, but as literary fiction intended to picture the prophets as heroes of faith. The real ‘prophets’ were the anonymous artists who were responsible for the final editing of the legacy of the historical prophets and who often used the authority of their predecessors to promulgate their own theological views. This volume brings together studies about this theme by members of the British and Dutch societies for Old Testament study. Attempts to recover some of the biographical data and authentic experiences of the prophets alternate with penetrating analyses of the theological depth and stylistic virtuosity of the prophetic books.The volume will be particularly useful to all those interested in the interpretation of the prophetic books of the Old Testament.
Authors: Johannes de Moor and Spronk