Author: John Bergsma
The observation of the Jubilee Year 2000 by many Christian groups worldwide generated renewed interest in the theological, historical, and socio-economic aspects of the biblical jubilee. This book begins with an analysis of the historical origins of the jubilee institution in ancient Israel, and then traces the reinterpretation of the jubilee and the text of Leviticus 25 through the Old Testament, the Second Temple literature, and the Qumran documents. It demonstrates that, with the passage of time, the socio-economic implementation of the jubilee is increasingly de-emphasized in favor of an eschatological interpretation, in which the jubilee itself functions as a type of the final age, and cycles of jubilee years are employed to calculate when this age will arrive.
Author: John Bergsma

Abstract

A careful analysis of the Qumran "sectarian" texts reveals a consistent preference for self-identification as "Israel" rather than "Judah." In fact, they contain no unambiguous identifications of the community as "Judah" or its members as "Judeans". Like most biblical texts and unlike Josephus and the authors of 1–2 Maccabees, the Qumran community does not equate Israelite with Judean. They regard themselves as the vanguard of the eschatological restoration of the twelve tribes; for them, the Judean state is not the sole heir of biblical Israel.

In: Dead Sea Discoveries
Author: John S. Bergsma

Abstract

The Jubilee cycle should be 49 years in length, since the Jubilee Year counts as both the fiftieth year of the previous cycle and the first of the next.

In: Vetus Testamentum
In: The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran
In: The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran
In: The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran
In: The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran
In: The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran
In: The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran
In: The Jubilee from Leviticus to Qumran