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Abstract

In Colossians 3:5 the author exhorts his readers to “Put to death τὰ µέλη τὰ ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς.” Throughout the history of interpretation, the noun µέλος has most often been taken to refer to “earthly members” (KJV, NASB) or more generally to “what is earthly in you” (NRSV). This chapter argues that µέλος is best translated “melody” in Colossians where it operates within a musical metaphor to express ethical realities. Two comparable musical and ethical usages of µέλος are offered and interpreted from Philo of Alexandria and Ignatius of Antioch. Finally, an assessment is provided which argues that the grammatical-historical exegetical method exhibited in the chapter should be considered as a key methodological model and instrument for spiritually formative theological interpretation of Scripture.

In: Theological Interpretation of Scripture as Spiritual Formation

Abstract

This chapter situates theological interpretation of Scripture in the context of the historical-critical method and spiritual formation. It begins by introducing the historical-critical method, elaborating its emergence, and then showing its inability to interpret the biblical text sufficiently on its own terms. The chapter then surveys the counter-response of theological interpretation of Scripture, revealing its promise and yet potential pitfalls. Thereafter, it briefly introduces spiritual formation and how it tangibly relates to TIS, showing specifically how TIS itself is spiritually formative. The chapter concludes by briefly summarizing the other chapters in this book.

In: Theological Interpretation of Scripture as Spiritual Formation

Abstract

This chapter proposes a consensus position on the nature of Scripture and the appropriate commensurate methodologies for its theological interpretation. It asserts that TIS requires a more specific consensual catholic scriptural and interpretive benchmark than currently exists across the movement—a regula catholica (catholic rule) and a regula interpretatio (interpretation rule)—in order to be properly ecclesially-calibrated and in order to generate a biblically-faithful, spiritually-formative theological interpretation of Scripture. A four-fold framework is articulated that organizes common approaches to theological interpretation into a tangible, replicable cluster of interpretive techniques that serve the purpose of spiritually-formative scriptural analysis and exegesis. A critical engagement of the views of key TIS proponents is offered that argues for a scriptural ontology that is characterized by textual determinacy and textual integrity within the breadth of the catholic tradition across the ages. Lastly, building on the work of John Webster, a theological rationale is offered that demonstrates how the various aspects of a regula interpretatio are themselves instrumental for spiritual formation rather than functioning as merely human tools for the grammatical, historical, and literary analysis of the biblical text.

In: Theological Interpretation of Scripture as Spiritual Formation
Volume Editors: and
Academic expertise is essential. But have you ever wondered how it itself is spiritually formative? This book, coming from an interdisciplinary assortment of scholars, shows how the exegetical methods of Theological Interpretation of Scripture (TIS) are themselves spiritually formative. This book provides a diverse collection of essays that focus on theological interpretative methods that result in a unique transformational experience not achieved through historical-critical or grammatical-historical approaches alone. Renowned thinkers—such as biblical scholar Ben Witherington III, historical theologian Mark Elliott, and theologian Arthur Sutherland—offer new works that explore how reading theologically can transform theology, cultures, and individuals. These new studies focus on the theological exegesis of such thinkers as Mother Teresa, Thomas Aquinas, Ignatius of Antioch, and Clement of Alexandria. The collection also includes several important and timely pieces that show how theological interpretation leads to moral formation within diverse cultural groups including African American and Latinx communities.

The primate Margarita stevensi n. gen. and n. sp. is described from late Eocene sediments of Texas, North America. The crushed skull of the type specimen is in the size range of Lepilemur leucopus, and the most recent relative of the new form appears to be the middle Eocene European adapid Europolemur klatti from the Geiseltal localities of the DDR. There are no indications that Margarita is closely related to the notharctine adapids. The new primate suggests that the Eocene of eastern North America was the homeland of lemuriforms with close European phylogenetic affinities. The posteriorly directed foramen magnum indicates a relatively small brain size and the dentition suggests an insectivorous-carnivorous dietary regime.

In: Folia Primatologica

The newly prepared middle ear cavity of Rooneyia viejaensis revealed the enlarged lateral branch of the internal carotid, an ancestral tarsiiform but advanced primate character. The ectotympanic is well inside the bulla proper and it appears that the annulus membrane and the tissues of the external auditory tube became ossified to form the tarsiiform ectotympanic. The polarity of several character clines of tarsiiform basicrania are discussed. Evidence is lacking from basicranial morphology to corroborate the hypothesized special relationship of microchoerine omomyids and Tarsius.

In: Folia Primatologica