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John M. Kirk

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One of Anna-Brita Stenström’s major legacies is an easily-learnable, highly adaptable model of discourse analysis. In this paper, the model is demonstrated in practice on the basis of six short transcribed excerpts from different naturally-occurring speech situations and dramatic dialogue.

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John M. Kirk

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This paper proposes a methodology for teaching students critical skills in corpus linguistics. The methodology comprises two pro formas: one for corpus searching, and one for reading scholarly articles. Through the use of these pro formas, students develop a critical ability which they can then apply to their own project work before submission for assessment.

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Corpora Galore

Analyses and Techniques in Describing English

Edited by John M. Kirk

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John M. Kirk

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This article investigates the pragmatic uses of the discourse marker well in broadcast discussions using the data from the British and Irish components of the International Corpus of English. Building on the model of pragmatic functions developed by Aijmer (2013), the article shows well to have three main pragmatic functions: coherence, involvement and politeness. In turn, the article discusses several subfunctions of coherence well: as a turn-initial discourse connective, a marker of reported speech, a marker of word search and self-repair; and several subfunctions of involvement: as a marker of direct agreement, partial agreement, implied agreement, disagreement, neither agreement or disagreement, and of challenge. Each subfunction is quantified and the distribution in each corpus compared. Beyond close, contextualised readings of 230 examples, the article triangulates the register of broadcast discussions, the discourse marker well, and the regions of Ireland and Great Britain.

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Edited by John M. Kirk and Iseabail Macleod

The skillful use of the Scots language has long been a distinguishing feature of the literatures of Scotland. The essays in this volume make a major contribution to our understanding of the Scots language, past and present, and its written dissemination in poetry, fiction and drama, and in non-literary texts, such as personal letters. They cover aspects of the development of a national literature in the Scots language, and they also give due weight to its international dimension by focusing on translations into Scots from languages as diverse as Greek, Latin and Chinese, and by considering the spread of written Scots to Northern Ireland, the United States of America and Australia. Many of the essays respond to and extend the scholarship of J. Derrick McClure, whose considerable impact on Scottish literary and linguistic studies is surveyed and assessed in this volume.