Edited by John Sallis

Exploring the relation between Paul Klee's philosophical thought and art, this book deals both with the impact of Klee's art on recent philosophy and with the relation between Klee's own theoretical writings and his art. Through various approaches the contributors show how Klee's ideas are realized in his art and how, conversely, his art serves to expand and develop his theoretical conceptions.

Addressing temporality (Boehm); ascendancy and counterforce (Krell); artist as tree (Baracchi); visible space (Figal); nature sketches (Baumgartner); image of garden (Schmidt); prominence of rhythm (Barbarić); musical elements (Schuback); tragedy (Acosta); space of transformation (Vallega); Merleau-Ponty and Cézanne (Johnson)--these essays, taken comprehensively, mark a major contribution to the understanding of the philosophical depth of Klee's art and thought.

This book is a reprint of Research in Phenomenology Volume 43, Issue 3.


Colloquium 4

Timaeus' Discourse on the Xώρα

JOHN SALLIS

John Sallis

John Sallis

Abstract

I would like to celebrate this beautiful setting, which has been set into the work of one of England's foremost painters, set beautifully, I would want to say. I would like in deed to celebrate it by setting what I shall say within the orbit of a word used by Plato to refer to the beautiful, one to which Heidegger has paid special attention, the word τò εxφαvεστατov, in German, das Hervorscheinendste, in English, the most radiant, that which most shines forth.1 I would like also to offer most sincere thanks to David Krell for arranging this colloquium in this lovely setting; also for many other things, not the least being the phrase that I have borrowed from him and used as the first of the two titles for this lecture, a debt on which I have now, however inadequately, to try to make good.

John Sallis

John Sallis