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This paper proposes an inter-disciplinary approach for illuminating the cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education, and for designing appropriate learning experiences. The cognitive schemas are analysed in terms of the objects and instruments of three inter-related activity systems: vocational practice, vocational education learning settings and vocational teacher education. Using cultural historical activity theory, the cognitive schemas needed as instruments in vocational activity are derived from considerations of the objects of contemporary working practice. These instruments, in turn, are assumed to be the objects of vocational education preparing vocational learners for the realities of contemporary and future workplaces. Further, the teaching schemas (instruments) that vocational teachers need in vocational educational practice are suggested as an important object of teacher education, preparing teachers for the challenges of vocational education. The paper uses this analysis to argue that an important object of vocational teacher education learning experiences should be the kinds of declarative, specific procedural and metacognitive procedural knowledge that the teacher can, in turn, use in engaging vocational learners in activities appropriate as preparation for work. The required learning activities in teacher education are examined in terms of Stevenson’s (2004) concept of memorable activity and Beach’s (1999) idea of consequential transitions. In particular, it is argued that teacher education in this field needs to involve consequential transitions that interconnect the different forms of cognitive artefacts of vocational and vocational educational theory and practice, including personal knowledge of workplace activity, discipline-based (theoretical) knowledge, encapsulated and scripted expert knowledge (Boshuizen et al., 1995) and the informal knowledge that new learners bring to the setting. Suggestions are made for engaging trainee teachers in appropriate kinds of memorable activity through consequential transitions. These include explicitly designed experiences of eliciting, rendering and articulating different kinds of tacit and codified, personal and public meanings, and the relationships among them.

In: Teachers' Professional Development
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Taisō Yoshitoshi (1839-1892) was the most popular woodblock artist of his day. Customers lined up on the day of publication for his prints of historical characters and beautiful women. His career, which introduced subtle psychological observation to the artistic and representational world of ukiyo-e, straddled the tumultuous late Edo and early Meiji periods. Yoshitoshi was fascinated by the supernatural, and some of his best work concerns ghosts, monsters, and charming animal transmutations. Yoshitoshi’s strange tales presents two series that focus on his depictions of the weird and magical world of the transformed. The first series dates from the beginning and the second from the end of the artist’s abbreviated career, encapsulating his artistic development. One Hundred Tales of Japan and China (Wakan hyaku monogatari) of 1865 is based on a game in which people told short scary ghost tales in a darkened room, extinguishing a candle as each tale ended. New Forms of Thirty-six Strange Things (Shinken sanjūrokkaisen) of 1889-92 illustrates stories from Japan’s rich heritage of legends in more serene and objective ways. The book opens with a study of Japanese ghost prints and analysis of Yoshitoshi’s changing treatments of the genre, and reproduces three rare paintings by the artist. This is Yoshitoshi at his most whimsical and imaginative.

This title is now only available as a paper back with ISBN 9789004337374.
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Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839-1892) was the most influential and prolific woodblock print artist of Meiji Japan. This book presents his masterpiece, the wildly popular One Hundred Aspects of the Moon (Tsuki Hyakushi). The series was begun in 1885 and completed just before the artist's death in 1892. New designs were eagerly awaited, with editions selling out before dawn on the day of publication. The introduction of this book comprehensively treats the artist's life and work. Each of the one hundred images in the series is shown here in full colour and nearly life-size. Opposite each design a commentary gives the story behind the picture. These wonderful tales form a panorama of Japanese history and legend that resonates with the richness and subtlety of traditional Japanese culture. This is a reprint of the 1992 San Francisco Graphic Society publication.
In: Researching Technology Education
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This paper examines the idea of competence in terms of the ‘development of meaning’. Data are drawn from three main studies: one of people engaged in everyday work activities, one of people at university who were undertaking ‘mundane’ part-time work at the same time, and one of homeless people studying the humanities. From the studies, it is argued that different kinds of meanings are made in different kinds of activities, that not all of these meanings can be expressed in terms of the verbalisable, collective, ‘sacred’ concepts of the culture, and that there are cognitive, dispositional and physical struggles involved in connecting ‘mundane’ and ‘sacred’ meanings. It is concluded that the development of competence involves not only engagement in ‘mundane’ activities, but in connecting these understandings with the ‘sacred’ meanings of the culture; and that common approaches to competency-based vocational education and assessment ignore this need.

In: VET Boost: Towards a Theory of Professional Competencies
Author:

This paper proposes an inter-disciplinary approach for illuminating the cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education, and for designing appropriate learning experiences. The cognitive schemas are analysed in terms of the objects and instruments of three inter-related activity systems: vocational practice, vocational education learning settings and vocational teacher education. Using cultural historical activity theory, the cognitive schemas needed as instruments in vocational activity are derived from considerations of the objects of contemporary working practice. These instruments, in turn, are assumed to be the objects of vocational education preparing vocational learners for the realities of contemporary and future workplaces. Further, the teaching schemas (instruments) that vocational teachers need in vocational educational practice are suggested as an important object of teacher education, preparing teachers for the challenges of vocational education. The paper uses this analysis to argue that an important object of vocational teacher education learning experiences should be the kinds of declarative, specific procedural and metacognitive procedural knowledge that the teacher can, in turn, use in engaging vocational learners in activities appropriate as preparation for work. The required learning activities in teacher education are examined in terms of Stevenson’s (2004) concept of memorable activity and Beach’s (1999) idea of consequential transitions. In particular, it is argued that teacher education in this field needs to involve consequential transitions that interconnect the different forms of cognitive artefacts of vocational and vocational educational theory and practice, including personal knowledge of workplace activity, discipline-based (theoretical) knowledge, encapsulated and scripted expert knowledge (Boshuizen et al., 1995) and the informal knowledge that new learners bring to the setting. Suggestions are made for engaging trainee teachers in appropriate kinds of memorable activity through consequential transitions. These include explicitly designed experiences of eliciting, rendering and articulating different kinds of tacit and codified, personal and public meanings, and the relationships among them.

In: Teachers' Professional Development
In: Researching Technology Education
Author:

During the 1850’s and 60’s there was increasing discontent regarding the provision of school education as controlled and managed by the Church of Scotland. This led to a number of Parliamentary Bills being brought forward proposing a new national system. The Church opposed these mainly on the grounds that there was no guarantee that Religious Instruction would continue to have a place in the school curriculum. In February 1872 Lord Advocate George Young presented in the Commons an Education Bill ‘To extend and amend the provisions of the law of Scotland on the subject of education’ in order that ‘the means of procuring efficient education … may be furnished and made available to the whole people of Scotland.’ This was passed on 2nd August as The Education (Scotland) Act 1872 and transferred the full control of schools from church to state. The Act included a Preamble allowing for Religious Instruction to be taught according to ‘use and wont’. The removal of its management of school education may be seen as a major blow for the Church of Scotland, removing a historic contribution to national life. In actual fact, the consequence was the revitalising of the Church enabling it to concentrate its energy on strengthening its influence in the community and in outreach to its parishes with a new sense of social mission. Although the Church had lost its direct control of the school curriculum it continued to support Religious Instruction through its Teacher Training, its Sunday schools and its ministerial representation on school boards.

Open Access
In: Scottish Educational Review
In: GothicK: Origins and Innovations
In: Logos