Search Results

Abstract

This chapter discusses a few elements of the 1969 Polish translation of Ulysses and the author’s own ongoing translation. It tackles the issues of language register in passages from “Calypso” and “Oxen,” including polysemic and syntactic ambiguities, and it presents translatorial priorities such as attention to semantic and syntactical cruxes that defy translation, preservation of Joyce’s economy of expression, and attention to Joyce’s patterns of repetition, foundational to textual memory in the original. Repetitive elements frequently resist transfer into other languages and Wawrzycka’s ongoing Polish retranslation challenges some of the strictures of TL rules, siding with the source text wherever possible.

In: Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century

Abstract

One novel way to approach James Joyce’s writings is to read them steganographically. Steganography (“veiled writing”) is the practice of hiding information from unintended eyes in plain sight; indeed it conceals the very fact that a message is being sent at all. This essay considers textual formations that draw attention to themselves as texts in Ulysses (such as the acrostic cipher, anagrams, the boustrophedonic cryptogram, acronyms) to reveal the significance of their materiality and their importance both as carriers of messages and as Joyce’s experiments with steganographic methods. It posits that secret communication codes (like jargon code, cues, elements of Ogham and Bog Latin writing) deepen our understanding of Joyce’s use of the veiling methods and of their functions as steganographic tests that engage the reader in pursuit of secrets buried in the text. Becoming aware of the steganographic aspects of Joyce’s writing heightens our appreciation of how deliberate Joyce was in configuring language events as carriers of steganographically charged textual elements, as messages in plain sight about the rewards of attentive reading, one that involves detecting additional frame of reference (a code, a pattern) necessary to retrieve meanings behind his elaborate textual stratagems.

In: Publishing in Joyce's Ulysses
Volume Editor: Jolanta Wawrzycka
In Reading Joycean Temporalities, Jolanta Wawrzycka gathered scholars who address James Joyce’s experimental treatment of narrative time in terms that go beyond the much-discussed monologue intérieur and stream of consciousness. Contributors examine Joyce’s attempts to render temporal simultaneity through inescapably spatial means of language, including his deployment of Lessing’s concepts of nacheinander and nebeneinander; analyse Joyce’s handling of modalities of time, (in)finitude and temporal disharmonies in time/sense; and tackle Joyce’s engagements with historical time, Homeric time, and with poetic “markers of time”. The essays re-contextualize modernist and postmodernist critical, theoretical, philosophical and narratological polemics on time/temporality, relativity, language, and memory, and offer insightful readings of Joyce’s “double-timing”, “writing of finitude”, “time without measure”, and psychological vs. mechanically measured time.

Contributors are: Valérie Bénéjam, Tim Conley, Erika Mihálycsa, Stephanie Nelson, Christine O’Neill, Cóilín Owens, Fritz Senn, Annalisa Volpone and Jolanta Wawrzycka.
In: Reading Joycean Temporalities
In: Reading Joycean Temporalities
In: Reading Joycean Temporalities

Rhythm was of prime importance to Joyce: at the age of twenty, he declared that the “rhythmic speech” in Shakespeare or Verlaine was a vehicle for otherwise incommunicable emotion. In “Circe,” rhythm is declared “a universal language” and “the first entelechy.” This essay analyses how various temporalities are woven into the structural rhythm of Joyce’s language, with particular attention to Joyce’s Chamber Music. The essay identifies various markers of time embedded in the poems’ lexical stratum, in the metronomic rhythm of poetic feet, in repetition, and in rhetorical formations that contribute to Joyce’s complex presentation of time flow: clock-time markers that point to seasons and times of day/night, or “time” suggested in grammatical tenses and verb aspects that add to the complexity of temporal modalities of the poems.

In: Reading Joycean Temporalities
In: Reading Joycean Temporalities
In: Reading Joycean Temporalities
Volume Editors: Jolanta Wawrzycka and Erika Mihálycsa
The essays in Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century straddle the disciplines of Joyce studies, translation studies, and translation theory. The newest scholarly developments in these fields are well reflected in recent retranslations of Joyce’s works into Italian, Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Dutch, Turkish, German, South Slavic, and many other languages. Joyce critics and Joyce translators offer multi-angled critical attention to the issues of translation and retranslation, enhanced by their diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds and innovative methodologies. Because retranslations of Joyce have also exerted significant influence on target language cultures, students and readers of Joyce and, more broadly, of modernist and world literature, will find this book highly relevant to their appreciation of literature in translation.