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The Heiberg Period: 1824-1836, 2nd Revised and Augmented Edition
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This is the first of a three-volume work dedicated to exploring the influence of G.W.F. Hegel’s philosophical thinking in Golden Age Denmark. The work demonstrates that the largely overlooked tradition of Danish Hegelianism played a profound and indeed constitutive role in many spheres of Golden Age culture.
This initial tome covers the period from the beginning of the Hegel reception in the Danish Kingdom in the 1820s until the end of 1836. The dominant figure from this period is the poet and critic Johan Ludvig Heiberg, who attended Hegel’s lectures in Berlin in 1824 and then launched a campaign to popularize Hegel’s philosophy among his fellow countrymen. Using his journal Kjøbenhavns flyvende Post as a platform, Heiberg published numerous articles containing ideas that he had borrowed from Hegel. Several readers felt provoked by Heiberg’s Hegelianism and wrote critical responses to him, many of which appeared in Kjøbenhavnsposten, the rival of Heiberg’s journal. Through these debates Hegel’s philosophy became an important part of Danish cultural life.
Editor:
Today research in the history of Western philosophy is a global phenomenon. The series features the work of leading scholars from the different subfields, regardless of where they are found in the world. Philosophy is a discipline substantially enriched by a broad dialogue of perspectives that transcend the local contexts — the series New Research in the History of Western Philosophy provides a forum for this dialogue. The series also strives to showcase the modern importance and relevance of the history of Western philosophy to pressing issues of our day. It seeks single-author monographs and collected-author volumes that demonstrate that the texts, figures, and debates from the Western philosophical tradition are still very much alive not only in the academic field of philosophy but also in many other areas beyond its conventional boundaries. The series welcomes new approaches and studies on lesser-known figures and texts.

Prior to 2023, the volumes in New Research in the History of Western Philosophy were published as a subseries of the Value Inquiry Book Series. Please visit the Studies in the History of Western Philosophy page to view previous publications.
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Abstract

Feuerbach’s The Essence of Christianity tries to argue for the claim that it is a mistake to think of God as something objective, transcendent and fundamentally different from human beings, as is traditionally done in theology. Instead, according to his view, God is simply the essence of what is human, projected onto a fictional external entity. For this reason Feuerbach proposes to refer to his undertaking not as theology or philosophy of religion but as anthropology, that is, a study of the human. What is both striking and provocative here is that he argues that his radical reinterpretation of Christianity will not undermine it or diminish it; on the contrary, he claims, his theory will help to preserve it. In this paper I critically explore this claim by Feuerbach. Does it make sense to understand the field of theology or even the philosophy of religion as anthropology? I argue that Feuerbach’s proposal is a highly dubious attempt to reframe theology. His claim to be offering a support for religion is, I argue, disingenuous.

In: Modern and Postmodern Crises of Symbolic Structures
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Abstract

This article argues that we can track specific stages in the development of subjectivity by tracing the different accounts of the afterlife. As the sense of subjectivity and individuality becomes more pronounced, this is reflected in ever more refined views of the underworld or heaven, as the case may be. An attempt is made to establish the basic framework of this claim with just a few examples, which can be used as the point of departure for a more detailed study. The article examines the Mesopotamian, Hebrew, Greek, Roman and Medieval Christian views of the afterlife, which, when taken together, clearly show an undeniable trajectory.

In: The Bounds of Myth
The Martensen Period: 1837-1841, 2nd Revised and Augmented Edition
Author:
This is the second volume in a three-volume work dedicated to exploring the influence of G.W.F. Hegel’s philosophical thinking in Golden Age Denmark. The work demonstrates that the largely overlooked tradition of Danish Hegelianism played a profound and indeed constitutive role in many spheres of the Golden Age culture.
This second tome treats the most intensive period in the history of the Danish Hegel reception, namely, the years from 1837 to 1841. The main figure in this period is the theologian Hans Martensen who made Hegel’s philosophy a sensation among the students at the University of Copenhagen in the late 1830s. This period also includes the publication of Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s Hegelian journal, Perseus, and Frederik Christian Sibbern’s monumental review of it, which represented the most extensive treatment of Hegel’s philosophy in the Danish language at the time. During this period Hegel’s philosophy flourished in unlikely genres such as drama and lyric poetry. During these years Hegelianism enjoyed an unprecedented success in Denmark until it gradually began to be perceived as a dangerous trend.
Editor:
As of 2023, the volumes in Studies in the History of Western Philosophy are published in a separate series rather than as a subseries of the Value Inquiry Book Series. Please visit the homepage of the new series, titled New Research in the History of Western Philosophy, to view new publications.

Today research in the history of Western philosophy is a global phenomenon. The series features the work of leading scholars from the different subfields, regardless of where they are found in the world. Philosophy is a discipline substantially enriched by a broad dialogue of perspectives that transcend the local contexts — the Studies in the History of Western Philosophy series provides a forum for this dialogue. The series also strives to showcase the modern importance and relevance of the history of Western philosophy to pressing issues of our day. This series seeks single-author monographs and collected-author volumes that demonstrate that the texts, figures and debates from the history of the Western tradition are still very much alive in the academic field of philosophy, and in many areas beyond its conventional boundaries.
Author:

Abstract

Nietzsche is not generally associated with the stream of nineteenth-century philosophy that begins with Hegel and runs through the Hegelian schools. While thinkers such as Feuerbach, Strauss, Bauer, Marx, and Engels all studied either with Hegel himself or his students, Nietzsche belongs to a later generation and never studied in Berlin. On the face of it, he does not seem to have been influenced profoundly by Hegel as were these other figures. Nonetheless, I wish to argue that he was involved in some of the same discussions that exercised these thinkers. Most obviously, like them, he believed that there was a crisis in modern Europe and that an important part of this had to do with religion. Specifically, the article tries to show that Nietzsche has a theory of alienation that is usually associated with figures from the Hegelian school such as Feuerbach and Marx.

In: The Modern Experience of the Religious
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Abstract

It is usually thought that Hegel’s philosophy of religion did not have much of an impact on the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. While this is generally true with regard to the field of philosophy, the influence of Hegel can be detected in the social sciences. This paper offers a comparison of Hegel’s Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion and Durkheim’s The Elementary Forms of Religious Life. Points of commonality are explored in the two thinkers’ respective accounts of (1) the scientific methodology for the study of religion, (2) the need to establish the origin of religion and its history, (3) the understanding of the truth of religion, (4) the role of symbolism, (5) and the social basis of religion.

In: Encounters with Nineteenth-Century Continental Philosophy
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Abstract

This second tome treats the most intensive period in the history of the Danish Hegel reception, namely, the years from 1837 to 1841. The main figure in this period is the theologian Hans Lassen Martensen who made Hegel’s philosophy a sensation among the students at the University of Copenhagen in the late 1830s. This period also includes the publication of Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s Hegelian journal, Perseus, in 1837 and 1838, and Frederik Christian Sibbern’s monumental review of it, which represented the most extensive treatment of Hegel’s philosophy in the Danish language at the time. During this period Hegel’s philosophy flourished in unlikely genres such as drama and lyric poetry with Heiberg’s speculative comedy, Fata Morgana (1838), and his satirical classic, “A Soul after Death” (1841). In this period Hegel’s philosophy also make inroads in fields such as jurisprudence and art criticism. During these years Hegelianism enjoyed an unprecedented success in Denmark until it gradually began to be perceived as a dangerous trend.

In: A History of Hegelianism in Golden Age Denmark, Tome II
Author:

Abstract

This second tome treats the most intensive period in the history of the Danish Hegel reception, namely, the years from 1837 to 1841. The main figure in this period is the theologian Hans Lassen Martensen who made Hegel’s philosophy a sensation among the students at the University of Copenhagen in the late 1830s. This period also includes the publication of Johan Ludvig Heiberg’s Hegelian journal, Perseus, in 1837 and 1838, and Frederik Christian Sibbern’s monumental review of it, which represented the most extensive treatment of Hegel’s philosophy in the Danish language at the time. During this period Hegel’s philosophy flourished in unlikely genres such as drama and lyric poetry with Heiberg’s speculative comedy, Fata Morgana (1838), and his satirical classic, “A Soul after Death” (1841). In this period Hegel’s philosophy also make inroads in fields such as jurisprudence and art criticism. During these years Hegelianism enjoyed an unprecedented success in Denmark until it gradually began to be perceived as a dangerous trend.

In: A History of Hegelianism in Golden Age Denmark, Tome II