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Gadda’s Quer pasticciaccio brutto di via Merulana (1946-1947) is the story of a sordid murder related from police inspector Ciccio Ingravallo’s point of view. The use of slang and vernacular becomes a stylistic choice that transcends the mere replication of regional voices: it is an author’s resource to produce a baroque and flowery style, with a profusion of rhetorical, phonetic and symbolic nuances. This paper describes the processes in Juan Ramón Massoliver’s and Louis Bonalumi’s translations, analysing the different ways in which both translators deal with dialects, regional variations, and paralinguistic elements, by focusing on the spoken discourse represented in written language. An interdisciplinary method of study is suggested, giving outlines of functional, textual, pragmatic, and other translation strategies (House, Chesterman, Venuti).

In: The Voices of Suspense and Their Translation in Thrillers

Gadda’s Quer pasticciaccio brutto di via Merulana (1946-1947) is the story of a sordid murder related from police inspector Ciccio Ingravallo’s point of view. The use of slang and vernacular becomes a stylistic choice that transcends the mere replication of regional voices: it is an author’s resource to produce a baroque and flowery style, with a profusion of rhetorical, phonetic and symbolic nuances. This paper describes the processes in Juan Ramón Massoliver’s and Louis Bonalumi’s translations, analysing the different ways in which both translators deal with dialects, regional variations, and paralinguistic elements, by focusing on the spoken discourse represented in written language. An interdisciplinary method of study is suggested, giving outlines of functional, textual, pragmatic, and other translation strategies (House, Chesterman, Venuti).

In: The Voices of Suspense and Their Translation in Thrillers
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Abstract

La coscienza di Zeno (1923), by Italo Svevo was not published in Spain until 1956. After analysing the first censored version, this chapter studies the subsequent translations to develop an overview of the reception of this novel in Spain. This research follows a dual approach: textual and sociocultural analysis. The textual analysis allows us to understand the translational strategies adopted by Carlos Manzano, whose version is the best known in Spain. This translation was subject to numerous processes of revision and re-writing, which affect the legibility of the text and its pragmatic effect. The successive re-editions and re-prints of this translation, as well as the appearance of a new Spanish version of the book, will also be analysed from a sociological-cultural perspective, in which the canon, the dynamics of the publishing market, and the book’s incorporation in the list of twentieth century classics are all key elements not only to understand its publication history, but also to assess its possible presence in future catalogues.

Open Access
In: Retranslation and Reception