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José Miguel Roncero Martín

Abstract

In the last decade, the eight Arctic states (Canada, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, Russia, Sweden and the United States) have published policies and strategies for the Arctic. These national documents offer the vision of what the Arctic is to become in the next decades. They also identify challenges and propose specific solutions. These national policies and strategies offer a vision of the roadmap for (sustainable) development, environmental protection, and the development and empowerment of the Arctic inhabitants. These documents also underline in a broader sense the expected role of indigenous communities when it comes to the development of the region. This paper offers a brief analysis of these documents. The objectives of the research presented here are to identify whether the elements of human security can be found in the national plans of the eight Arctic states, and if so, to what extent.

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Helene Peterbauer and and José Miguel Roncero Martín

Abstract

On the background of Jean-Paul Sartre’s concept of engaged literature, the authors analyze the theories widening the concept of security as well as the concepts of human and societal security by means of literary examples addressing human and society-related security aspects in the Arctic. The authors explore how these security aspects are depicted, what human and societal challenges are reflected in engaged ‘Arctic literature’, and whether security narratives are present in these texts. In so doing, this chapter also advocates for a more comprehensive approach to studying Human Security issues, which includes products of art and (popular) culture, such as works of fiction, as well. This chapter focuses on Scandinavian, primarily Norwegian literature on the Arctic, with a particular focus on the Barents region. The literary examples presented in the following exemplify the potential and the tendency of works of fiction to thematize human, rather than traditional security challenges – as is the case with the examples of Sámi literature reviewed below – while the examples of Svalbard novels discussed below also demonstrate that even though literature originating from a context of contested territory will inevitably address traditional security issues, these concerns are naturally entangled with matters of Human Security.

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Edited by Kamrul Hossain, Jose Miguel Roncero Martin and Anna Petrétei

Human and Societal Security in the Circumpolar Arctic addresses a comprehensive understanding of security in the Arctic, with a particular focus on one of its sub-regions – the Barents region. The book presents a comparative and interdisciplinary perspective to which the Arctic is placed as referent, and special attention is paid to the viewpoint of local and indigenous communities. Overarching topics of human and societal security are touched upon from various angles and disciplinary approaches, The discussions are framed in the broader context of security studies. The volume specifically addresses the challenges facing the Arctic population which are important to be looked at from human security perspectives.

Series:

Edited by Kamrul Hossain, José Miguel Roncero Martín and Anna Petrétei

Series:

Kamrul Hossain, José Miguel Roncero Martín and Anna Petrétei

Series:

Edited by Kamrul Hossain, José Miguel Roncero Martín and Anna Petrétei

Series:

Edited by Kamrul Hossain, José Miguel Roncero Martín and Anna Petrétei

Series:

Edited by Kamrul Hossain, José Miguel Roncero Martín and Anna Petrétei

Series:

Kamrul Hossain, José Miguel Roncero Martín and Anna Petrétei