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In: Political Autobiographies and Memoirs in Antiquity
In: Vigiliae Christianae
In: Zutot
Author: Joseph Geiger
Although both national sites of commemoration and Halls of Fame for a variety of human endeavours are widespread, little thought was given to the fact that the statues in the Forum Augustum were the first assemblage of this kind. This book identifies the Greek and Roman backgrounds to and influences on Augustus' decision as well as his probable motives for setting up these statues. The central chapters deal with the structure of the Forum and its statues, and provide a detailed analysis of the list of men (and women) known to have been included and the criteria for inclusion. Finally the additions to the heroes between Augustus and Trajan and the later impact of this Gallery of Heroes are discussed.
In: Herod and Augustus
Author: Joseph Geiger

Abstract

Plutarch devotes one of his two Jewish questions in his Quaestionum Convivalium to the God of the Jews. The discussion is very well informed, depending as it does on Hecataeus of Abdera, and is mainly devoted to Jewish ritual, arguing that its similarities prove the identity of the God of the Jews with Dionysus. Though interpretatio Graeca is a well-known phenomenon, Plutarch’s approach here is quite astonishing. Despite his involvement and deep interest in religion, including foreign (e.g., Egyptian) religions he entirely disregards what is considered by moderns as Judaism’s most prominent feature contrasting it with ‘pagan’ antiquity, monotheism—as he was also totally ignoring the young and rising Christianity. This chapter will try to provide the background to this strange silence.

In: Plutarch’s Unexpected Silences
In: The Statesman in Plutarch's Works, Volume I: Plutarch's Statesman and his Aftermath: Political, Philosophical, and Literary Aspects
In: Journal for the Study of Judaism
In: Mnemosyne
Author: Joseph Geiger

Abstract

The appearance of Epaminondas in Plutarch’s De genio Socratis, who neither contributes significantly to the dialogue nor takes part in the liberation of Thebes from the Spartan rulers, seems gratuitous. This essay argues that an intertextual interplay must have existed between Plutarch’s essay and his lost Life of Epaminondas, the author’s favourite hero. Whatever the exact nature of that interplay, the historical background of Plutarch’s work was the recent assassination of Domitian: the forcible removal of tyrants was not only a theoretical question referred to by Epaminondas in the De genio, but also of immediate historical relevance.

In: Mnemosyne