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Joshua A. Fogel

Abstract

Naitō Konan (1866-1934) was one of towering figures of twentieth-century Sinology, in Japan, China, and elsewhere. His theories concerning Chinese history continue to influence us all, often through secondary or tertiary means. Among his many books and articles is a large volume entitled Shina shigaku shi (History of Chinese historiography), arguably the first such comprehensive work in any language and still unsurpassed to this day, roughly eighty years after the chapters which comprise it were first delivered as lectures in Kyoto.

Naitō argued that Chinese historical writing was divided, as we all know now, into two traditions: the comprehensive style (tongshi) launched by Sima Qian and the single-period style (duandai shi) begun somewhat later by Ban Gu. Naitō himself always favored the former, and he showed a marked predilection for the major historical works over the centuries by Chinese with the character tong in their titles: such as Liu Zhiji's Tong shi, Du You's Tong zhi (about which he lectured before the Japanese emperor in 1931), Ma Duanlin's Wenxian tongkao, and most notably Zhang Xuecheng's Wenshi tongyi. He did not disragrd or disrespect the duandai shi approach, but he did believe that by cutting off chunks of history one could not get a proper sense of the long-term forces at work in the historical process, what the great French historians later would call la longue durée.

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Joshua A. Fogel

In the year 57 C.E., the court of Later Han dynasty presented a gold seal to an emissary from somewhere in what is now Japan. The seal soon vanished from history, only to be unearthed in 1784 in Japan. In the subsequent two-plus centuries, nearly 400 books and articles (mostly by Japanese) have addressed every conceivable issue surrounding this small object of gold. Joshua Fogel places the conferment of the seal in inter-Asian diplomacy of the first century and then traces four waves of historical analysis that the seal has undergone since its discovery, as the standards of historical judgment have changed over these years and the investment in the seal’s meaning have changed accordingly.
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Edited by Joshua A. Fogel

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Edited by Joshua A. Fogel

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Edited by Joshua A. Fogel

It has long been known that the modern Chinese language inherited numerous terms from Japanese and that Japanese coined many of those terms in the last decades of the 19th century. These seven essays address the actual processes by which a discreet number of terms came into being, how they outdistanced competitors, and the persons and texts involved in the process. Rather than relying on received tropes of translation heritage, these essays delve much deeper into the particularities of their cases. They set a standard for subsequent scholarship.
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Between China and Japan

The Writings of Joshua Fogel

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Joshua A. Fogel

Over the past thirty-five years, Joshua Fogel has pioneered the study of Sino-Japanese cultural and political relations—understood as the intersections of the histories of these two countries. This volume brings together many of his essays and reviews in this new field. For a variety of reasons discussed within, scholars have been reluctant to look at these two nation’s historical connections, either through comparative analysis or actual interactions. Fogel’s work has focused squarely here. Among the issues addressed are Japanese scholarly views of modern China and Chinese history, Chinese considerations of the Japanese language in the Ming and Qing periods, the Japanese immigration to the East Asian Mainland (especially to Shanghai and Harbin), and more.
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Joshua A. Fogel

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Joshua A. Fogel

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Joshua A. Fogel