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Japanese culture, marked both by a strong character of its own and by a continuing absorption of foreign elements, is surprising for its ability of perpetual renewal without loss of identity. The country's industrial organization and productivity have ensured an impact on world affairs far exceeding the numerical importance of its population.
Brill's Japanese Studies Library is concerned with the languages, history and culture of Japan in past and present. Among the subjects included are history—political, social, economic based on primary sources, including biography; religion; classical literature and performing arts; law; language; philosophy; history of science; et cetera. Geographically the series covers the Japanese isles as well as manifestations of Japanese presence abroad. Chronologically the period from the beginnings of written history until the present is covered. The series includes monographs on substantial subjects, thematic collections of articles, handbooks, text editions and translations.

The series published an average of four volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The Ise Stories and the Politics of Cultural Appropriation
Courtly Visions: The Ise Stories and the Politics of Cultural Appropriation traces—through the visual and literary record—the reception and use of the tenth-century literary romance through the seventeenth century. Ise monogatari ( The Ise Stories) takes shape in a salon of politically disenfranchised courtiers, then transforms later in the Heian period (794-1185) into a key subtext for autobiographical writings by female aristocrats. In the twelfth century it is turned into an esoteric religious text, while in the fourteenth it is used as cultural capital in the struggles within the imperial household. Mostow further examines the development of the standardized iconographies of the Rinpa school and the printed Saga-bon edition, exploring what these tell us about how the Ise was being read and why. The study ends with an Epilogue that briefly surveys the uses Ise was put to throughout the Edo period and into the modern day.
In: Performing "Nation"
In: Performing "Nation"
In: Ut pictura amor
In: Courtly Visions
In: Courtly Visions
In: Courtly Visions
In: Courtly Visions
In: Courtly Visions