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Chapter 6 Patterns of Participation in Reflective Writing and Their Implications for Teacher Leadership Development
In: Developing Teachers as Leaders

This paper examines the connection between heritage language and culture and the construction and maintenance of social and personal identities of the Cora, an indigenous people of the Mexican Sierra del Nayar, in Northwestern Mexico. Using the frameworks of the socially and linguistically mediated mind (Dennet, 1991; Harré & Gillet, 1994; Searle, 1998) and the Continua of Biliteracy (Hornberger, 2002; Hornberger & Wang, 2008), the paper presents data from interviews with Cora speakers to show how language and cultural connection support identity establishment and maintenance among the Cora. The data indicate that the Cora experience pressure to assimilate into mainstream Mexican society, yet they continue to manage multiple identities. One of the ways they do this is by shifting between an endogenous Cora identity and an integrated Mexican identity. The paper closes with recommendations on teaching Cora language and culture in school, so that their identities can be maintained and strengthened.

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In: Heritage Language Journal

A framework to examine vitality of languages in a specific context, developed by Francois Grin and elaborated by Joseph Lo Bianco, specifies that three conditions are necessary for language vitality and revitalization: Capacity Development, Opportunity Creation, and Desire (COD). This framework was developed as a tool to help communities and governments support regional and minority languages and to promote policy development at the national level related to language revitalization and use. The framework is used in this issue as a guide for examining the vitality of languages spoken in the United States as “heritage” languages, which are spoken by individuals who have home, community, and intergenerational connections with the languages as well as some proficiency in them.

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In: Heritage Language Journal
Chapter 1 Reflective Writing and Its Potential for Developing Teacher Leaders
In: Developing Teachers as Leaders
Chapter 7 Reflective Writing to Develop Teacher Leaders
In: Developing Teachers as Leaders
This book focuses on reflective writing, guiding teachers to recognize their potential as professional leaders. The shift to online and blended learning models now favored in education encourages a broader understanding of leadership, particularly its growing relevance to teachers. These models, combined with reflective writing, foster flexible, inclusive teacher learning that responds to each teacher’s strengths, can be used individually and collaboratively to develop teachers as leaders inside and outside the classroom who are critically involved in creating their own professional learning environments. The authors examine leadership in a global range of teaching contexts, each chapter raising diverse issues for teachers aspiring to be leaders in this post-COVID world.

All royalties from this book are donated to the Instituto dos Cegos da Paraiba Adalgisa Cunha (ICPAC), a school in João Pessoa, Paraíba, Brazil, that serves the low vision and blind community in the area. For years, the Institute has collaborated as a supervised internship site for various teacher education university programs, providing inspiring field work experiences such as those described in Chapter 4 by Carla Reichmann. Brill is proud to support this important cause and match the donation to the Instituto dos Cegos da Paraiba Adalgisa Cunha (ICPAC).