Abstract

Mentoring is widely acknowledged as an important determinant in the type of support given to pre-service teachers’ prior to their entry to the profession. Mentors, as cooperating teachers, provide valuable in situ opportunities for professional learning in the practicum settings.

The present study articulates four mentoring roles (or profiles) that arise from research using the 62-item Mentoring Profile Inventory (MPI). The MPI automatically provides a report to the user divided into three sections: (1) dimensions of motivators for and challenges to mentoring; (2) separate motivator and challenge balance charts; and (3) a mentoring profile grid. The grid, which is the focus of this paper, distinguishes four roles that encompass the work of cooperating teachers within the context of mentoring: partner, advocate, nurturer, and facilitator. The grid is a graphic representation of the emphasis that a mentor places on each of the four roles as part of their mentoring practice. These four roles emerged from the analysis of the MPI responses from 1950 cooperating teachers from fifteen countries.

This research adds new insights to the existing body of research on mentoring by articulating an overall profile based on the four roles for a mentor where each role is directly induced from empirical response patterns of mentors (not deduced from an a priori framework). This research may enable teacher educators to better support the professional development of mentors in practicum settings according to an individual mentor’s profile or an aggregate profile for a cohort of mentors

In: Championing Cutting-Edge 21st Century Mentoring and Learning Models and Approaches
Series Editors: Juanjo Mena, Ruth Kane, and Cheryl J. Craig
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.
The essence of this book is to shed light on the nature of current educational practices from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Both teachers and their trainers provide a better understanding of teacher training and learning processes. Mutual interrelations and the provision of knowledge between academia and schools are essential for merging discourses and aligning positions, whereby turning practice into theory and theory into practice in today’s teaching is vital for suitably responding to multiple issues and increasingly diverse contexts.

The array of studies from around the world compiled in this volume allow readers to find common ground, discover shared concerns, and define goals. Studying teaching practice and training in different contexts reveals the state-of-the-art practices and identifies those issues that enable educators to understand the complexities involved. The chapters examine the development of our knowledge and understanding of teaching practices, at the same time as analysing engaging learning environments, the sustainability of learning and teaching practices, and highlighting new practices based on the use of ICTs. The diverse teaching contexts considered in this compilation of international research are organized according to the following topics: Teaching occupational learning and knowledge; Teacher beliefs and reflective thinking; and Innovative teaching procedures.

The contributors are Laura Sara Agrati, Dyann Barras, Verónica Basilotta Gómez-Pablos, Benignus Bitu, Robyn Brandenburg, Heather Braund, Michael Cavanagh, Chiou-hui Chou, Jean Clandinin, Leah L. Echiverri, Maria Flores, Francisco García Peñalvo, María García-Rodríguez, Ana García-Valcárcel, Stephen Geofroy, Raquel Gómez, Jenna Granados, Hafdís Guðjónsdóttir, Jukka Husu, Jóhanna Karlsdóttir, Keith Lane, Celina Lay, Samuel Lochan, Marta Martín-del-Pozo, Ella Mazor, Sharon M. McDonough, Lennox McLeod, Juanjo Mena, Wendy Moran, Brian Mundy, Nkopodi Nkopodi, Lily Orland-Barak, Edda Óskarsdóttir, Samuel O. Oyoo, Stefinee Pinnegar, Eleftherios Soleas, Lystra Stephens-James, Linda Turner, Antoinette Valentine-Lewis, and Sarah Witt.
In: Teachers’ Professional Development in Global Contexts
In: Teachers’ Professional Development in Global Contexts
In: Teachers’ Professional Development in Global Contexts

Abstract

The Teaching practicum is probably the most genuine period of professional training at the teaching degree. The use of tools such as the teacher’s professional journal helps to reflect and systematize the experience of the teacher in training. This chapter includes the design of a mobile application to facilitate the use of the teacher’s professional journal through its digitalization in order to experience the benefits it brings as a tool that favors the teacher’s own practice and professional development. An analysis of the content of 20 teacher journals written by students of Infant Education at the University of Salamanca was made with the aim of extracting the main reflection topics.

The result was a carefully produced indexing tree that has been used as an analysis tool in the NVIVO12 software for the study of qualitative data. The tree allowed extracting a significant and complete categorization of the teacher’s professional journal that makes possible its analysis and constitutes the starting point for the design of the prototype of the mobile application in a paper, which will be developed.

The digitization of the professional teachers’ diary based on the most frequent topics of the teachers themselves in practice shows the relevance of the diary since it is based on a thematic index that arises from practice, not theory. This will favor its implementation both by teachers in training and by active professionals contributing to their professional development.

In: Education beyond Crisis

Abstract

In this chapter we describe teachers’ professional practice by scrutinizing the type of practical knowledge that preservice teachers acquire during the practicum period as well as by assessing the type of support they receive from their mentors and peers. We conducted the study with preservice students from the Primary Education degree at the University of Salamanca, Spain. They were recorded a teaching a lesson and also reflecting on it afterwards: first individually, then with a peer preservice teacher and, finally, with a mentor.

The data analysis followed three stages. We first identify critical incidents (positive and negative) according to three major themes: the teacher, the student and the content. Secondly, we conducted a propositional analysis to classify the contet of the preservice teachers’ reflections according to four types of practical knowledge. Thirdly, we analyze the mentoring support according to the MERID model ().

The results show that reflecting with the help of another person (either a peer or a mentor) is more beneficial than acomplishing reflection individually since they elicit more inferential and sophisticated knowledge than individual reflections do. In addition, our data suggest that the assistance of mentors leads to more generalizable knowledge that preservice teachers can use in future school experiences.

In: Teachers’ Professional Development in Global Contexts