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Chapter 1 The Mentoring Profile Inventory Grid

Abstract

Mentoring is widely acknowledged as an important determinant in the type of support given to pre-service teachers’ prior to their entry to the profession. Mentors, as cooperating teachers, provide valuable in situ opportunities for professional learning in the practicum settings.

The present study articulates four mentoring roles (or profiles) that arise from research using the 62-item Mentoring Profile Inventory (MPI). The MPI automatically provides a report to the user divided into three sections: (1) dimensions of motivators for and challenges to mentoring; (2) separate motivator and challenge balance charts; and (3) a mentoring profile grid. The grid, which is the focus of this paper, distinguishes four roles that encompass the work of cooperating teachers within the context of mentoring: partner, advocate, nurturer, and facilitator. The grid is a graphic representation of the emphasis that a mentor places on each of the four roles as part of their mentoring practice. These four roles emerged from the analysis of the MPI responses from 1950 cooperating teachers from fifteen countries.

This research adds new insights to the existing body of research on mentoring by articulating an overall profile based on the four roles for a mentor where each role is directly induced from empirical response patterns of mentors (not deduced from an a priori framework). This research may enable teacher educators to better support the professional development of mentors in practicum settings according to an individual mentor’s profile or an aggregate profile for a cohort of mentors

In: Championing Cutting-Edge 21st Century Mentoring and Learning Models and Approaches

Abstract

Mentoring is widely acknowledged as an important determinant in the type of support given to pre-service teachers’ prior to their entry to the profession. Mentors, as cooperating teachers, provide valuable in situ opportunities for professional learning in the practicum settings.

The present study articulates four mentoring roles (or profiles) that arise from research using the 62-item Mentoring Profile Inventory (MPI). The MPI automatically provides a report to the user divided into three sections: (1) dimensions of motivators for and challenges to mentoring; (2) separate motivator and challenge balance charts; and (3) a mentoring profile grid. The grid, which is the focus of this paper, distinguishes four roles that encompass the work of cooperating teachers within the context of mentoring: partner, advocate, nurturer, and facilitator. The grid is a graphic representation of the emphasis that a mentor places on each of the four roles as part of their mentoring practice. These four roles emerged from the analysis of the MPI responses from 1950 cooperating teachers from fifteen countries.

This research adds new insights to the existing body of research on mentoring by articulating an overall profile based on the four roles for a mentor where each role is directly induced from empirical response patterns of mentors (not deduced from an a priori framework). This research may enable teacher educators to better support the professional development of mentors in practicum settings according to an individual mentor’s profile or an aggregate profile for a cohort of mentors

In: Championing Cutting-Edge 21st Century Mentoring and Learning Models and Approaches
Series Editors: Juanjo Mena, Ruth Kane, and Cheryl J. Craig
The ISATT conference series represents an effort to compile international research and practices on Teacher Education. It draws upon a variety of educational approaches, procedures, and teaching contexts where the field takes form. The aims and scope of the ISATT book series is to promote and bring together the best papers presented at the Biennial conferences of the association. The ISATT’s main goal is to increase insights into the identity, role, contexts and work of teachers, and the process of teaching.

Abstract

This study discusses the theme of teacher performance evaluation in Brazil. It aims to carry out an inventory of research published in five Brazilian journals in the field of education (and related fields), which specialise from early childhood education to tertiary education evaluation.

Thus, our interest is to identify major concepts and the possible teaching performance evaluation methods and techniques already developed and in use in Brazil. A mapping of the themes, objectives, methodologies and results from the papers published in four specialised journals was conducted: Estudos em Avaliação Educacional, Ensaio: Avaliação e Políticas Públicas em Educação, Meta: Avaliação and Avaliação: Revista da Avaliação da Educação Superior. The ultimate purpose is to create a theoretical-methodological inventory that can serve as a basis for reviewing and/or implementing assertive policies for teachers’ evaluation, eliminating this important gap between teacher training and work.

Main results indicate that teacher performance evaluation is an incipient topic in Brazilian specialised literature in educational evaluation from which only 18 papers out of 2400 where found. This can be interpreted as an important gap to be filled with new and deeper studies.

In: Authentic Assessment and Evaluation Approaches and Practices in a Digital Era
The essence of this book is to shed light on the nature of current educational practices from a variety of theoretical perspectives. Both teachers and their trainers provide a better understanding of teacher training and learning processes. Mutual interrelations and the provision of knowledge between academia and schools are essential for merging discourses and aligning positions, whereby turning practice into theory and theory into practice in today’s teaching is vital for suitably responding to multiple issues and increasingly diverse contexts.

The array of studies from around the world compiled in this volume allow readers to find common ground, discover shared concerns, and define goals. Studying teaching practice and training in different contexts reveals the state-of-the-art practices and identifies those issues that enable educators to understand the complexities involved. The chapters examine the development of our knowledge and understanding of teaching practices, at the same time as analysing engaging learning environments, the sustainability of learning and teaching practices, and highlighting new practices based on the use of ICTs. The diverse teaching contexts considered in this compilation of international research are organized according to the following topics: Teaching occupational learning and knowledge; Teacher beliefs and reflective thinking; and Innovative teaching procedures.

The contributors are Laura Sara Agrati, Dyann Barras, Verónica Basilotta Gómez-Pablos, Benignus Bitu, Robyn Brandenburg, Heather Braund, Michael Cavanagh, Chiou-hui Chou, Jean Clandinin, Leah L. Echiverri, Maria Flores, Francisco García Peñalvo, María García-Rodríguez, Ana García-Valcárcel, Stephen Geofroy, Raquel Gómez, Jenna Granados, Hafdís Guðjónsdóttir, Jukka Husu, Jóhanna Karlsdóttir, Keith Lane, Celina Lay, Samuel Lochan, Marta Martín-del-Pozo, Ella Mazor, Sharon M. McDonough, Lennox McLeod, Juanjo Mena, Wendy Moran, Brian Mundy, Nkopodi Nkopodi, Lily Orland-Barak, Edda Óskarsdóttir, Samuel O. Oyoo, Stefinee Pinnegar, Eleftherios Soleas, Lystra Stephens-James, Linda Turner, Antoinette Valentine-Lewis, and Sarah Witt.
In: Teachers’ Professional Development in Global Contexts