Author: Julia Novak
Given the increasing popularity of literary festivals, open mics, and poetry slams, one could justifiably claim that the English-speaking world is currently experiencing a ‘Live Poetry’ boom. Yet, despite this raised awareness for the aesthetic and social potential of performed poetry, academia has barely responded, failing in the process to update and adapt its concept of poetry to meet these recent developments.
Bridging this critical gap, this volume provides for the first time a full methodological ‘toolkit’ for the analysis of live poetry by drawing together approaches from diverse disciplines concerned with speech and forms of cultural performance. Most notably, these include literary studies, paralinguistics, musicology, kinesics, theatre and performance studies, and folklore studies.
This innovative methodology is demonstrated through sample analyses based on a mixed corpus of audio and video recordings of poetry performances, as well as on personal interviews with practitioners of live poetry. Of value to the scholar and poetry enthusiast alike, this volume presents an indispensable guide for anyone interested in understanding and analysing poetry’s evolution through its current ‘spoken word’ renaissance.

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Author: Julia Novak

Clara Wieck Schumann was one of the leading concert pianists of the nineteenth century. Born in Leipzig in 1819, she received her musical training from her father, Friedrich Wieck, with whom she began touring Europe at the age of 12. At the age of 18, Clara Wieck had her international break-through in Vienna, where she rose to unprecedented fame and was appointed Imperial and Royal Court Virtuosa by Ferdinand I. She had fallen in love with Robert Schumann two years earlier, and Vienna marked a turning point not only in her career but also in her relationship with Wieck and Schumann. Friedrich Wieck, who for many years had acted as her manager and thus shaper of her artistic reputation, battled fiercely with Schumann over the control of his daughter’s fortunes, but eventually lost her to the young composer. Clara married Robert Schumann in 1840. Clara Wieck Schumann’s story has long fascinated biographers and film makers and has been captured in several ‘fictionalised biographies,’ texts which transgress genre boundaries and renegotiate the relationship between historical fact and fiction. Focusing on Clara’s Vienna experience and the gendered nature of her stardom, this chapter will compare Janice Galloway’s novel Clara (2002) with J. D. Landis’s Longing (2000), Werner Quednau’s Clara Schumann (1955), and Dieter Kühn’s novel Clara Schumann, Klavier (1994) in order to point out some of the choices the liminal status of biofiction affords the author and the effect of these choices on the portrayal of Clara’s rise to fame and the impact of marriage on her celebrity status.

In: Stardom: Discussions on Fame and Celebrity Culture
In: Live Poetry
In: Live Poetry
In: Live Poetry
In: Live Poetry
In: Live Poetry
In: Live Poetry
In: Live Poetry
In: Live Poetry