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Author: Li Jun

With increasing re-recognition in recent years, education in China has drawn more and more global attention. China Watch is a signature column of Beijing International Review of Education, aiming at updating international communities with the latest policy move and practice improvement of education in China, featured with short articles around 2,500 words each.

Topics of China Watch include but are not limited to learning, teaching or schooling; governance, leadership or planning in education; evaluation or assessment; teacher education; moral or citizenship education; language education; stem education; inclusive education; girls (women) education; vocational education; educational finance; privatization;

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In: Beijing International Review of Education
Author: LI Jun

With increasing re-recognition, education in China has recently drawn more and more global attention. China Watch is the signature column of Beijing International Review of Education, aiming at updating the international community with the latest policy move and practice improvement of education in China, featured with short articles around 2,500 words each.

Topics of China Watch include but are not limited to learning, teaching, schooling; governance, leadership or planning in education; educational evaluation (assessment); teacher education; moral or citizenship education; language education; stem education; inclusive education; girls (women) education; vocational education; educational finance; privatization; or internationalization

Free access
In: Beijing International Review of Education
Author: LI Jun

With increasing re-recognition, education in China has recently drawn more and more global attention. China Watch is the signature column of Beijing International Review of Education, aiming at updating the international community with the latest policy move and practice improvement of education in China, featured with short articles around 2,500 words each.

Topics of China Watch cover but are not limited to latest changes including improvements in learning, teaching, schooling; governance, leadership or planning in education; educational evaluation (assessment); teacher education; moral or citizenship education; language education; stem education; inclusive education; girls (women) education; vocational education;

Free access
In: Beijing International Review of Education
Author: Jun Li

With increasing re-recognition, education in China has recently drawn more and more global attention. China Watch is the signature column of Beijing International Review of Education, aiming at updating the international community with the latest policy move and practice improvement of education in China, featured with short articles around 2,500 words each.

Topics of China Watch cover but are not limited to latest changes including improvements in learning, teaching, schooling; governance, leadership or planning in education; educational evaluation (assessment); teacher education; moral or citizenship education; language education; stem education; inclusive education; girls (women) education; vocational education;

Free access
In: Beijing International Review of Education
Author: Jun Li

Abstract

Based on broad observations of the development of Confucius Institutes and Classrooms in Africa over a decade, this article focuses on educational partnerships between Chinese and African educational institutions and their implications for international development, as they relate to international development in the era of post-Covid-19. The author identifies the Confucian Zhong-Yong approach to educational partnerships through Confucius Institutes and Classrooms in Africa, a pragmatic model for educational development centered on Confucianism. Three core characteristics of Confucian educational partnerships – demand-driven, ethics-based and pragmatic – are seen as the key to the success of such partnerships. Reflecting on Ubuntu from a Confucian perspective, the author concludes that China’s humanistic Zhong-Yong approach to partnerships has a unique potential to re-envision education for international development in ways that may be of interest to such international developmental agencies as the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, the World Bank, and the United Nations.

In: Bandung
Author: Jun LI

With increasing re-recognition, education in China has recently drawn more and more global attention. China Watch is the signature column of Beijing International Review of Education, aiming at updating the international community with the latest policy move and practice improvement of education in China, featured with short articles around 2,500 words each.

Topics of China Watch include but are not limited to learning, teaching, schooling; governance, leadership or planning in education; educational evaluation (assessment); teacher education; moral or citizenship education; language education; digital education; stem education; inclusive education; girls (women) education; vocational education; educational finance; privatization;

Free access
In: Beijing International Review of Education
Author: Jun LI

This article aims at a comprehensive examination of the Chinese model of teacher education by critically revisiting the developmental trajectory of the teacher education system in China over the past century, with a particular focus on policy trends since the 1990s. It interrogates the Chinese model of teacher education with two macro lenses: the historical and the comparative. The historical lens looks deeply into the Chinese way of reform with a catch-up mentality in various stages, while the comparative lens locates the Chinese model of teacher education in an international context. The paper begins with a comprehensive review of the related literature, surveys the historical pathway of China’s modern teacher education system since its birth in 1897, presents an overview of the current provisions of the system, and examines recent policy trends in the landscape of China’s teacher education. Finally, the article concludes that the Chinese model consists of a hybrid system of teacher education provided by normal schools, normal colleges and universities, with the participation of comprehensive universities and internet-based higher education institutions, and accompanied by a consistent licensing system for the teaching profession. With such core features as independence, openness, adaptability and diversity based on Confucian epistemology and pragmatism, the Chinese model of teacher education is likely to illuminate new paths for the development of education and the pursuit of excellence in the global community.

In: Frontiers of Education in China