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  • Author or Editor: Justus Theodore Ghormley x
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Doublets, Textual Divination, and the Formation of the Book of Jeremiah
The biblical book of Jeremiah was frequently expanded and revised through duplication by anonymous scribes in ancient Judea. Who were these scribes? What gave them the authority to revise divinatory texts like Jeremiah? And when creating duplicates, what did they think they were doing? In Scribes Writing Scripture: Doublets, Textual Divination, and the Formation of Jeremiah, Justus Theodore Ghormley explores possible answers to these questions. The scribes who revised Jeremiah are textual diviners akin to divining scribal scholars of ancient Near Eastern royal courts; and their practice of expanding Jeremiah through duplication involves techniques of textual divination comparable the practice of textual divination utilized in the formation of ancient Near Eastern divinatory texts.
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture
In: Scribes Writing Scripture

Abstract

This article describes the presence of three different degrees of scribal revision in Jeremiah: (1) multidimensional revision—the revision of multiple aspects of a text in a single moment by one scribe (such as relocating the Oracles Against the Nations and the addition of new headings); (2) single-dimensional revision—the revision of one aspect of a text (such as the addition of new headings by itself) again by one scribe in one moment; and, (3) incremental revision—the ongoing, piecemeal revision of one aspect of a text by an unknown number of scribes over a longer period of time. This article offers criteria for distinguishing these degrees of revision and applies the criteria to two categories of scribal expansion in Jeremiah: the insertion of names and titles and the addition of new headings. It concludes that these features took shape through a combination of all three degrees of revision.

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