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Global Citizenship Development and Sources of Moral Values
Volume Editors: Fritz K. Oser and Wiel Veugelers
Getting involved' in society means becoming a human person by doing something for others and thus being connected to mankind and society. Youngsters who get involved, give meaning to life and develop a feeling of agency. But ‘getting involved’ is not easy. Getting involved’ is necessary for living together, creating democracy and sustainability of a global world. The paradox is that in a modern, multicultural society ‘getting involved’ is even more important than in a traditional, more monocultural society.
‘Getting involved’ relates to various scientific orientations. Political, sociological, psychological and pedagogical questions are at issue, and all of these will be consulted in this volume. The main perspective however remains the issue of identity development relating to ‘getting involved’, and will therefore be psychological.
This book gives a broad overview of current research in the field of moral development and citizenship. It shows the diversity of concepts, research methodologies, and educational practices. The book also shows the influence of local social, cultural and political contexts.
The book can help researchers, teacher educators, politicians and practitioners in finding new and better ways of supporting youngsters in their moral and civic identity development.
In: Teachers' Professional Development
In: Teachers' Professional Development
Authors: Y. Alarie and K. Fritz

Abstract

Description of structures of all three larval instars of Heterosternuta diversicornis (Sharp) is presented. The chaetotaxy and porotaxy of the cephalic capsule, head appendages, legs, last abdominal segment, and urogomphi are discussed in detail. A close similarity between larvae of H. diversicornis, H. wickhami Zaitzev and H. cocheconis (Fall) is confirmed. All three species distinguish from the closely related species of the genus Neoporus Guignot by (i) a very short and constricted siphon, (ii) the primary setae FE8 and FE9 which are subequal in length to the maximum width of the metafemur (first instar), (iii) the absence of natatory setae on all tibiae and tarsi, and (iv) the contiguous position of the primary setae UR2 and UR3 on the urogomphomere 1.

In: Insect Systematics & Evolution
Aims, Modules, Evaluation
Within the central topics of the debate on teachers’ professionalism are the problems of research-based and evidence-based initial and lifelong teacher behavior. Although the statements on professional similarities of teacher actions with those of other (academic) professionals are very plausible, there remains a central task for teacher education programs: How to develop towards such expertise—which is equal to evidence convictions—effectively and efficiently. Which role do scientific research and its results play in this context? How can research results be converted into recommendations for teacher actions?
The contributions to this book focus on central problems of the conversion process: In the first part the goal dimension is treated: Maiello & Oser emphasize the relationship of central variables of teacher behaviour as identity, professional satisfaction or self-efficacy to teachers’ professional behaviour; Blömeke, Felbrich & Müller discuss the role of future teachers’ beliefs on the nature of mathematics; Stevenson uses cultural historical activity theory to work out cognitive schemas that can be targeted in vocational teacher education; Gruber tackles the problem of how vocational teachers can be supported to become experts by discussing especially four major possible research strategies.
The second part of this book is dedicated to possible intervention approaches by which the gap of theory and practice shall be bridged. Steiner & Steiner report on critical learning incidents which heavily influence the micro-processes which characterize teachers’ instructional measures; Winther differentiates the trait and state perspective of motivation with regard to their consequences for the learning process; Boekaerts focuses on aspects of collaborative learning; Weber sharpens her deliberations explicitly to a design experiment on the problem of initiating intercultural learning.
The third part of this book is a report of the use and the consequences of Oser’s model of teaching standards. Baer, Dörr, Fraefel, Kocher, Kiester, Larcher, Müller, Sempert & Wyss show results of a large study on the development of teacher competences run in Switzerland and Germany. The study observes the competence development of prospective teachers from the beginning of their teaching training up to the job entry phase. This book is published under the auspices of the Swiss Federal Office for Professional Education and Technology.
Old Research Demands and New Pathways
Internationally leading experts from four continents provide new views and pathways to teacher education and training. How can teachers be effectively and efficiently trained to master the complexity and the process conditions of teaching-learning situations? The chapters as a whole demonstrate that subtle knowledge of the conditions and variables of instructional processes is necessary. They provide new insight into the classroom. But the chapters also stress the necessity of reflection: Teachers have to learn how to judge and justify that knowledge and its use. Reflective behaviour, thus, is seem as the overall goal of teacher education and training The authors are aware that this goal might be classified as “idealistic” and present, therefore, complex examples for successful conducting instructional processes. They open the view on hidden or neglected dimensions of teaching and learning, discuss standards for teacher behaviour, present critical situations together with possible solutions and give hints for the use of technology. Together, these chapters present new perspectives for successful teacher actions and the corresponding preparation for successful instruction.
In: Competence Oriented Teacher Training