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In: A Companion to Early Modern Istanbul
Muqarnas 33 contains articles that range chronologically and geographically from a study of architectural innovations in the early mosque under the Umayyads to an analysis of archaeological finds in medieval Armenia, the book culture of Bijapur, and a discussion of a nineteenth-century Muslim cemetery in Malta. Readers will also discover essays on, respectively, the influence of a Tabrizi workshop on Cairene architecture in the fourteenth century, and the brilliant ceramic tiles of the fifteenth-century Uzun Hasan Mosque in Tabriz, as well as the latest research on the coffeehouses of Safavid Isfahan and on the architectural patronage of Shah ʿAbbas. A study of a Timurid pilgrimage scroll in the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha and an essay on Bihari calligraphy round out the volume. The Notes and Sources section features a never-before-published treatise on the Sultan Ahmed Mosque in Istanbul. Muqarnas 33 includes articles by Heba Mostafa, Diana Isaac Bakhoum, Sandra Aube, David Roxburgh and Mounia Abudaya-Chehkhab, Eloïse Brac de la Perrière, Keelan Overton, Charles Melville, Farshid Emami, Conrad Thake, Ünver Rüstem, and Hans Barnard, Sneha Shah, Gregory E. Areshian, and Kym F. Faull.

Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.


Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Muqarnas 31 contains articles spanning the vast parameters (both geographic and disciplinary) of the field of Islamic art and architecture, from Iberia to Central Europe to the Subcontinent, from the Madinat al-Zahraʾ in Cordoba to Ottoman textiles and costumes to Mughal painting. The volume also contains essays on lusterware produced in Seville in the Taifa period; gardens in the fourteenth-century text Bāgh-i Samanzār-i Nūshāb; the Elvan Çelebi complex in Anatolia; and Seljuq-era stucco sculptures from Iran.

Authors include Susana Capilla, Stephan Heidemann, Benjamin Anderson, Hamidreza Jayhani, Heike Franke, Amanda Phillips, Adam Jasienski, and Ulrich Marzolph, with contributions to the “Notes and Sources” section by Carmen Barceló and Anja Heidenreich, and Deniz Türker.
Author:
An in-depth examination of Plantin's large-scale production of books of hours, comprising a survey of their illustration as well as accounts of the general process by which they were printed. A pioneer study of great interest both from the art-historical and from the bibliographical point of view. Contains inter alia many additions and corrections's to Voet's The Plantin Press.
A Rights Disagreement in Democratic Societies
This book investigates the concepts of equality and dignity under same-sex marriage jurisprudence. Having surveyed the multinational developments of same-sex marriage and arguments from proponents and opponents, the writer studies the two concepts with an aim to revealing their inadequacies as grounds for contentious rights claims such as same-sex marriage. To truly live up to the spirit of equality and equal dignity, the writer argues that the seemingly uncompromising disagreement over the issue requires people to explore common ground to make room for deliberation. It also requires the disagreeing parties to acknowledge that their disagreement is about the best interpretation of fundamental values that everyone shares, and not confrontation between conflicting worldviews neither of which is comprehensible to the other.
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Abstract

P.J. Brepols (ca. 1778-1845), the founder of the Brepols publishing house, which is still active today, succeeded in establishing himself as a printer-publisher by focusing on the production of popular literature and prints and continually building up his clientele in the Netherlands. One lesser-known, but nonetheless important component of this initial publishing strategy and success are his editions pertaining to the devotion of the Virgin of Scherpenheuvel. In this article, I will focus on the popular devotional texts the Manier om godtvruchtelyk, en met profyt der zielen, te lezen het Heylig Roosen-kransken van Maria ... and Het nieuw Scherpenheuvels Trompetjen, editions of which were regularly printed by both Brepols and his contemporaries. Drawing upon an examination of extant copies of these books, as well as records of Brepols's business operations from ca. 1811 to ca. 1820, I will document the extent to which Brepols dominated the market for devotional publications for Scherpenheuvel, discuss his sales of these publications, and provide a detailed description of Brepols's editions of these texts in the concluding appendix. Although primarily a study of Brepols's publications, his approach to the printing and sale of these works offers an instructive example of how other printers in this period may have organized their operations.

In: Quaerendo
Author:

Abstract

Among the illustrations used for a 4to Missale Romanum published by Christopher Plantin in 1585 are five prints by Jan Wierix and four anonymous copies of his work, none of which are in Marie Mauquoy-Hendrickx's extensive catalogue, Les Estampes des Wierix (Brussels 1978-83). This new group of religious prints and an already known group of comparably scaled Wierix engravings appear formerly to have been part of a single series of images. A consideration of both the subjects represented and archival evidence suggests that the series had been commissioned for the illustration of books of hours and not the missals in which the engravings are seen today. Finally, a similar examination of the subjects represented in two other sets of Wierix plates catalogued by Mauquoy-Hendrickx (but not part of any known book) suggests that they may also have originally been intended for the illustration of books of hours.

In: Quaerendo
Managing Editor:
Muqarnas: An Annual on the Visual Cultures of the Islamic World is sponsored by the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Muqarnas 29 features a subset of articles involving cross-cultural interactions between East and West as manifested in the visual culture of the region. Articles addressing this theme include “Visual Cosmopolitanism and Creative Translation: Artistic Conversations with Renaissance Italy in Mehmed II’s Constantinople,” by Gülru Necipoğlu, and “The Bride of Trebizond: Turks And Turkmens on a Florentine Wedding Chest, circa 1460,” by Cristelle Baskins. The “Notes and Sources” section highlights new research on the medieval town of Hulbuk in Central Asia.

Contributors include: Gülru Necipoğlu, Cristelle Baskins, Ana Pulido-Rull, Matt D. Saba, Jasmin Badr, Mustafa Tupev, Ünver Rustem, Ethem Eldem and Pierre Siméon.