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Between 1400 and 1700, more commentaries were written than during any other period of ‘Western’ history, by a larger number of intellectual players who belonged to a broader spectrum of social strata, professions, intellectual groups, and language and knowledge communities. Among the early modern intellectuals, the Neo-Latin humanists were the most prolific commentary writers, text editors, and collectors of knowledge, with an almost irresistible inclination to comment on all kinds of texts, gen...

in Brill's Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World Online

What one regards as ‘erotic’ and ‘pornographic’ depends on cultural, social, religious, and intellectual discourses, and those of the fifteenth, sixteenth and seventeenth centuries certainly differ from those of the modern Western world of the nineteenth, twentiest and twenty-first centuries. ‘Pornography’ is a modern notion; from the nineteenth century until the 1970s, the term was mostly used in a depreciative sense to refer to representations of sexual activities that were considered obscene,...

in Brill's Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World Online

Francesco (Franciscus) Petrarca or Francis Petrarch (o20-7-1304 in Arezzo, †19-7-1374 in Arquà) was the eldest son of Elietta Canigiani and the Florentine notary Ser Piero Petracco, who was exiled in 1302 because he belonged to the bianchi. For this reason, Petrarch (henceforth P.) spent his life outside Florence, first in Tuscany (1304–1310) and afterwards in the Provence (Avignon, 1310–1353) and Northern Italy (1353–1374, Milan, Venice, and Padua). Having been taught grammar and rhetoric by Co...

in Brill's Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World Online

The genre of the Emblem is a true invention of early modern literary culture, and it is characterised by Neo-Latin humanism and the printing press. It was created by the Milanese humanist and jurist Andrea Alciato, who composed (from c. 1518 on) Latin poems rooted in the epigrammatic verse of classical antiquity (especially the Greek Anthology), and by the Augsburg printer of Alciato’s Emblematum libellus, Heinrich Steyner (also Steiner or Stainer), who had the ground-breaking idea of combining ...

in Brill's Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World Online