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Volume Editor: Karl Heinz Roth
Global Labour History is a latecomer to historical science. It has only developed in the last three decades. This anthology provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art. Prominent representatives of the discipline discuss its fundamental methodological and conceptual aspects. In addition, the volume contains field and case studies from Africa and Latin America, as well as from the Middle East and China. In these studies, the local, regional and continental constitutive processes of the working class are discussed from a global-historical perspective. The anthology has been composed as a Festschrift dedicated to Marcel van der Linden, the leading theoretician of, and networker for, Global Labour History.




Author: Karl Heinz Roth

Seven years ago, Adam Tooze’s comprehensive study of the Nazi economy found a vast and predominantly favourable resonance in the media and the historiographical community of the anglophone and German-speaking worlds. There are indeed many merits to Tooze’s study that deserve to be emphasised. But there are also some astonishing deficiencies and shortcomings. The gravest is Tooze’s failure to offer any argument whatsoever regarding the widening rift between the corporate business community and the cadres of the political-military institutions. The growing distance between the two precedes the terminal stage of the Nazi dictatorship, which began in the last quarter of 1943. If Tooze had addressed the well-established facts on this issue, he would likely not have been able to conclude on such an affirmative note and insist on the transatlantic happy end that supposedly put paid to the German elites’ adventures between 1931 and 1948.

In: Historical Materialism
In: On the Road to Global Labour History
In: On the Road to Global Labour History
In: On the Road to Global Labour History
In: On the Road to Global Labour History
Theorising the Global Labour Relations of the Twenty-First Century
Capitalism has proven much more resilient than Marx anticipated, and the working class has, until now, hardly lived up to his hopes.
The Marxian concept of class rests on exclusion. Only the ‘pure’ doubly-free wage-workers are able to create value; from a strategic perspective, all other parts of the world’s working populations are secondary. But global labour history suggests, that slaves and other unfree workers are an essential component of the capitalist economy.
What might a critique of the political economy of labour look like that critically reviews the experiences of the past five hundred years while moving beyond Eurocentrism? In this volume twenty-two authors offer their thoughts on this question, both from a historical and theoretical perspective.

Contributors include: Riccardo Bellofiore, Sergio Bologna, C. George Caffentzis, Silvia Federici, Niklas Frykman, Ferruccio Gambino, Detlef Hartmann, Max Henninger, Thomas Kuczynski, Marcel van der Linden, Peter Linebaugh, Ahlrich Meyer, Maria Mies, Jean-Louis Prat, Marcus Rediker, Karl Heinz Roth, Devi Sacchetto, Subir Sinha, Massimiliano Tomba, Carlo Vercellone, Peter Way, Steve Wright.
In: Beyond Marx
In: Beyond Marx