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Abstract

covid-19 has changed the way we sing in choirs and has seen the extraordinary uptake of Zoom as a video chat platform across society. This is a reflective tale of four choirs members and their insights into how they improvised with traditional choir singing in a Zoom space. It consideres how zoom pedagogies allowed them to bridge social isolation during the pandemic. It includes the voices of the conductor; music teacher/technician; the voice of a media savvy artist choir member and finally the voice of a singing visual educator. The article embeds Deleuzoguattarian thinking. It draws on the concepts of the machinic assemblage and becoming as choir participants who embraced Zoom to facilitate song. Singing in a zoom virtual choir brings forth a burgeoning new relational way of being. To find ways to sing and imagine life and self without physical, temporal and spatial borders.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy

Abstract

Through an ethnomethodological and dialogical encounter with Australian classrooms in the lived experience of two visual art (va) educators, the authors seek to learn how working between online and studio learning approaches shaped teacher perceptions of student learning during the outbreak of covid-19 in 2020 and 2021. The research has two phases. Phase 1 sees the two va educators create learning narratives. These narratives, reported in summary in the article, through both material and digital form became the baseline data. In Phase 2 these themes were reworked as conversational questions. These questions then became the stimulus for a critical reflective online video conversation between the two va educators. The resulting discussion around the borderlines looks beyond specific apps, platforms, or products that the teachers used, their successes and failures and examines the digital, non-digital, material, social relations and pedagogical realities and futures that may or may be possible in the context of the postdigital va secondary classroom. These educators have had little time to assess the shift from a strong and well researched studio-pedagogy to their virtual creative learning futures. The challenges of this shift are revealed through their personal experiences.

Open Access
In: Video Journal of Education and Pedagogy