Search Results

Outsiders Within

Urban African American Girls’ Identity & Science

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Kathryn Scantlebury

Pushed Back to Strength

Maintaining a Feminist Research Agenda in Multiple, Collaborative Teaching|Research Settings

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Kathryn Scantlebury

Vicente Talanquer, Kathryn Scantlebury and Larry Dukerich

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Edited by Kathryn Scantlebury, Jane Butler Kahle and Sonya N. Martin

Women in science education are placed in a juxtaposition of gender roles and gendered career roles. Using auto/biography and auto/ethnography, this book examines the challenges and choices of academic women in science education and how those challenges have changed, or remained consistent, since women have become a presence in science education. The book’s contributors span a temporal and spatial continuum and focus on how a variety of issues relate to the paradoxes for academic women in science education. Science is characterized as a masculine endeavor, while teaching is described as “women’s true profession”. Thus, female academics involved in science education are positioned in two paradoxes. First, as teachers they are involved in a feminized profession. However, within that profession, women faculty in science education work in a discipline viewed as a masculine enterprise. Further, these women work in educational institutions that have higher status and prestige than their sisters in elementary, middle or high schools. Second, female professors are “bearded mothers”. Women who have engaged in science education value rationality and logic and assume authority as participants in academe. The use of logic, the acceptance of authority and the assumption of power are masculine gender-stereotyped characteristics. This situation places women in a paradox, because others, including peers and students, expect them to display stereotypic female gender dispositions, such as mothering/nurturing, sacrificing their needs for others, and a commitment to the institution.
The topics include: discussing how their engagement with science impacted their career trajectories and re-direction from science to science education, the relationships of cultural and racial factors on career trajectories, and the dialectical relationship between women’s private|public lives and their agency (collective and individual) in the academy and its enactment within academic fields. The book documents the lives and careers of academic women in science education from the United States, Australia, the Caribbean, United Kingdom, and Europe.

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Karen Tonso, Kathryn Scantlebury, Wolff-Michael Roth and Kenneth Tobin

Science Education as a Material Issue?

Exploring the Role of Materiality in Science Education through the Lens of Baradian Theory

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Colin Hennessy Elliott, Shruti Krishnamoorthy, Catherine Milne and Kathryn Scantlebury

Abstract

In what ways can human-matter intra-action as a teaching lens frame science-teaching learning in the classroom?

Applying Karen Barad’s post humanist theory, we explore how techno-scientific practices allow us to investigate the rich context of education in the making. Such perspectives lead us to argue for a focus on how material-discursive practice emerge through the intra-activity between human and matter agents as a source of locally intelligible phenomena. Traditional humanist models of teaching and learning locate agential responsibility in a specific human agent, which serves to separate the world of education into dichotomies: the teacher from the taught, the knower from the known, the self from other, and the object from the subject. Baradian theory challenges us to focus instead on intra-actions, which do not assume pre-existing object agents but accepts that it is through specific intra-actions that phenomena in all their complexity emerge. We must work from the perspective that agential responsibility, which constitutes responsibly embodied engagement in a material world, and recognize that there are consequences, possibilities, and responsibilities for intra-actions. Drawing on examples from co-teaching, self-assessment and emergent classroom practice, we use Barad’s theory, specifically her notions of agential realism, diffraction and entanglement, to propose models of practice that make intra-actions the focus with the goal of making learning more ethical, affective and inclusive.

Anita Hussenius and Kathryn Scantlebury