Author: Katie Barclay

A key question for historians of emotion has been the relationship between the expression of emotion and the corporeal experience of emotion by historical subjects. Recently, work indebted to practice and performance theories has emphasised language’s productive capacities to produce emotion performatively. New Materialism extends this conversation by suggesting an alternative imagining of ‘matter’ – the corporeal – which attributes it greater agency in systems of discursive production. This article explores in particular the work of theorist Karen Barad and the implications of her work for the history of emotions.

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
Author: Katie Barclay

This introduction to the special issue on ‘Emotions and Change’ introduces the main theories of the role of emotion in processes of social and political change, as well as how emotion is theorised to change over time. It introduces the articles within this issue as part of this literature, highlighting how they contribute and extend the field, notably in their discussion of ambivalence and stasis as part of movement.

In: Emotions: History, Culture, Society
EHCS is dedicated to understanding the emotions as culturally and temporally-situated phenomena, and to exploring the role of emotion in shaping human experience and action by individuals, groups, societies and cultures.

EHCS welcomes theoretically-informed work from a range of historical, cultural and social domains. The journal aims to illuminate (1) the ways emotion is conceptualized and understood in different temporal or cultural settings, from antiquity to the present, and across the globe; (2) the impact of emotion on human action and in processes of change; and (3) the influence of emotional legacies from the past on current social, cultural and political practices.

EHCS is interested in multidisciplinary approaches (both qualitative and quantitative), from history, art, literature, languages, music, politics, sociology, cognitive sciences, cultural studies, environmental humanities, religious studies, linguistics, philosophy, psychology, and related disciplines. The journal also invites papers that interrogate the methodological and critical problems of exploring emotions in historical, cultural and social contexts, and the relation between past and present in the study of feelings, passions, sentiments, emotions and affects. Finally, Emotions also accepts theoretically-informed and reflective scholarship that explores how scholars access, uncover, construct and engage with emotions in their own scholarly practice.

Following an initial review process by the editors, EHCS sends acceptable submissions to two expert independent readers outside the author’s home institution, employing a double-blind review procedure.

EHCS is published on behalf of the Society for the History of Emotions.

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