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The Development of Commercial Law in Sweden and Finland provides a broad perspective on recent research into the history of North European commercial law in a comparative and international framework. The book brings together themes that have previously been considered largely from a national perspective.

Despite Sweden's and Finland's peripheral locations in Europe, global legal phenomena took place there as well. These countries were at the crossroads of cultures and commercial interests, allowing us to re-examine them as lively laboratories for commercial laws and practices rather than dismissing them as a negligible periphery. The importance of trade and international transactions cannot be disclaimed, but the book also emphasizes the resilient nature of commercial law.

Contributors are: Dave De ruysscher, Stefania Gialdroni, Ulla Ijäs, Marko Lamberg, Heikki Pihlajamäki, Jussi Sallila, and Katja Tikka.
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Abstract

In this chapter, I inspect the selling of tar in the novel and highly controlled system called tar company. The establishment of the company was part of the state developing of Sweden and reflected country’s need to sell tar as efficient as possible. This chapter wanders through the evolution of these different tar company models, which were improved by the local tradesman as well as Dutch merchants. In the focus are privileges that the Crown granted to the companies as a charter of foundation. These are the earliest attempts to create valid commercial norms concerning the incorporated companies. The main observation is the fact, that Sweden was not ready to build such functional corporation as the Dutch did in their East Indian companies at the same time. Lack of financial capital, Crown’s interference in the companies’ affairs combined with the interests of Dutch merchants created a demanding and challenging environment. However, the tar companies are an illustrative example of trial and error, which was necessary to the long-time progression of creating and modernizing early modern states legal and commercial institutions.

In: The Development of Commercial Law in Sweden and Finland (Early Modern Period–Nineteenth Century)
Author:

Abstract

In this chapter, I inspect the selling of tar in the novel and highly controlled system called tar company. The establishment of the company was part of the state developing of Sweden and reflected country’s need to sell tar as efficient as possible. This chapter wanders through the evolution of these different tar company models, which were improved by the local tradesman as well as Dutch merchants. In the focus are privileges that the Crown granted to the companies as a charter of foundation. These are the earliest attempts to create valid commercial norms concerning the incorporated companies. The main observation is the fact, that Sweden was not ready to build such functional corporation as the Dutch did in their East Indian companies at the same time. Lack of financial capital, Crown’s interference in the companies’ affairs combined with the interests of Dutch merchants created a demanding and challenging environment. However, the tar companies are an illustrative example of trial and error, which was necessary to the long-time progression of creating and modernizing early modern states legal and commercial institutions.

In: The Development of Commercial Law in Sweden and Finland (Early Modern Period–Nineteenth Century)