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Keith D. Stanglin

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Edited by Keith D. Stanglin

Jacobus Arminius (1559-1609) composed 61 public disputations during his brief tenure as professor of theology at Leiden University, 36 of which have never before been collected and published, and have been neglected by scholars for four centuries. This critical edition supplements the works of Arminius by presenting these texts in the original Latin, complete with notes and summaries in English. The texts are preceded by a helpful introduction to the genre of theological disputations. In addition, the question of disputation authorship is treated exhaustively for the first time, demonstrating Arminius's primary authorship of these documents.
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How Much Purer is the Synopsis Purioris Theologiae (1625)?

A Comparison of Leiden Disputations before and after Dordt

Keith D. Stanglin

Abstract

The claim implicit in the title of the Synopsis purioris theologiae is that there is a difference between the theological disputations at Leiden conducted before the Synod of Dordt and those conducted after it. This essay examines various possibilities for the nature and extent of this difference. After comparing the disputations with regard to large thematic elements, overall structure, and specific theological topics, it appears that the differences between the two sets of disputations are not as great as might be expected. One must go to hotly debated topics to find differences in the disputations. The Leiden theological handbooks that resulted from the cycles of disputations could, before Dordt, be inconsistent or even incoherent due to the theological diversity within the faculty. What was “purer” after Dordt was a faculty that, on the contested questions of the synod, was uniform in its teaching, a consistency reflected in its theological handbook.

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Arminius, Arminianism, and Europe

Jacobus Arminius (1559/60-1609)

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Edited by Th. Marius van Leeuwen, Keith D. Stanglin and Marijke Tolsma

19 October 2009 marked the 400th anniversary of the death of Jacobus Arminius in Leiden. He was esteemed for the way in which he sought a via media between strict Calvinism and a more humanistic variant of Christian belief. However, because of his deviation from mainstream Calvinism, he has also been violently attacked. Was he a pioneer, who enriched the Reformed tradition by opening it towards new horizons, or a heretic, who founded a new tradition, as an alternative to Reformed theology?

The day of the death of this remarkable theologian was commemorated with a conference at Leiden University on Arminius, Aminianism, and Europe (9 and 10 October 2009). The main contributions to that conference are collected in this book. The first part contains some essays on the thinking of Arminius himself: the structure of his theology, his relation to Augustine, and to Rome. The second part deals with Arminianism. Was it influenced by Socinianism, as its opponents often claimed? How was it received in Europe: in Germany, Switzerland (Geneva), England, and Ireland? How far did Arminianism prepare the way for the ideals of the Enlightenment, which made its entry later on in the seventeenth century? An extensive iconography of Jacobus Arminius and an annotated bibliography of all his known writings complete, in the third part, this volume.