In: Nordic Journal of International Law
In: European Journal of Health Law
Editor: Kevin Kennedy
This volume provides practitioners, academics and students with the first definitive coverage of NAFTA investment arbitration. Given the level of foreign direct investment within the NAFTA countries, the issue of redress for states in investment cases is a major one. The state dispute settlement mechanisms within NAFTAs Chapter Eleven are recognized as a model worthy of close examination.



The experts and scholars who have contributed to this work present a comprehensive overview of the first ten years of practice in the area of investment disputes under the NAFTA provision. As in any nascent undertaking, the successes, failures and controversies that have been the experience of the state parties involved in NAFTA, are keenly reflected in the Chapter 11 cases. It is in these experiences, as described by in the chapters of this timely volume, that the readers will find substantive and procedural insights into an emerging new area of public international economic law. Many see the workings of the NAFTA agreement, particularly Chapter 11, as a Rorschach test for how state parties can approach and effectively adjudicate investment disputes. For this reason all practitioners and scholars concerned with international trade and foreign direct investment issues should consult this book.



Published under the Transnational Publishers imprint.
Editor: Hugh Kennedy
History writing in Islamic Egypt was highly developed and no country in the Middle East has a richer or more developed tradition. This book is a collection of essays by leading scholars in the field, examining different authors, their works and the intellectual climate in which they flourished. Due prominence is given to the great historians of the Mamluk period (c.1260-1517) but also to the less well-known writers of the Ottoman period. The essays are also enlivened by insights into personalities and customs of the time.
This book will be of interest to historians of the Islamic world in mediaeval and modern times, and to all those who are concerned with history writing as an intellectual discourse.
Editor: Hugh Kennedy
For more information about the Encyclopeadia of Islam Online visit www.brillonline.nl
to view a demo, register for a free 30-day trial, or to place your order.

This title is part of the Encyclopaedia of Islam / Encyclopédie de l’Islam subscription, but is now also available to non-subscribers.

An Historical Atlas of Islam by William C. Brice was originally published by Brill in 1981. In November 2001, Brill published a new edition of An Historical Atlas of Islam / Atlas Historique de l'Islam, completely revised and substantially augmented by Professor Hugh Kennedy.

This unique publication provides an overview of Islamic history from its inception up to the beginning of the twentieth century.

An Historical Atlas of Islam/Atlas Historique de l’Islam is divided into ten sections:
- The Early Muslim Earth and Sky
- The Extension of the Muslim World
- The Arabian Peninsula
- Egypt and the Fertile Crescent
- Iran and Transoxania
- The Caucasus
- Anatolia and the Balkans
- Al-Andalus (Spain and Portugal) and al-Maghrib
- India and the Indian Ocean
- The Far East

Throughout these sections a broad variety of topics is being covered. From The Arabian Peninsula in the time of the Hijra to al-Andalus and al-Maghrib: The Muslim Conquest, and from Medieval Islamic Egypt to Islam in China.

About one third of the maps in this second edition are new and include
- Environments and Mineral Resources of the Islamic World
- Yemen and the Hadramaut
- The Arabian Peninsula in Islamic Times
- Iran under the Mongols; and under the Savafid and Qajar Dynasties
- The Fertile Crescent
- Caucasus in the Early Middle Ages
- The Maghrib in the Age of Almoravids & Almohads
- and many other regional maps.

Other maps in this edition, already available in the first edition, have been edited to make them even more consistent and accurate, e.g.
- The Muslim World
- Arabia
- Byzantine Anatolia
- Saljuq Anatolia
- Spain and the Mahgrib

A substantial number of new city maps has also been added to the second edition of An Historical Atlas of Islam/Atlas Historique de l’Islam, including
- Sanaa
- Damascus
- Aleppo
- Mosul
- Baghdad
- Cairo
- Isfahan
- Samarkand
- Cordoba
- Granada
- Delhi
- and many others.

The maps are intended to give historians of urban development an idea of the shape and structure of the cities and to assist them in locating city gates, walls and major monuments as they are referred to in historical texts. To achieve this, the maps reflect the situation before the changes of the twentieth century.

An Historical Atlas of Islam/Atlas Historique de l’Islam also includes a CD-ROM with all maps from the printed version. A user friendly navigation function, using an alphabetical index of places and regions guarantees quick and efficient access to the maps. Each individual map can be viewed in detail using the four-level zoom function.

CD-ROM System Requirements - Macromedia Director software

Macintosh
- Power Macintosh
- 12x CD-Rom player
- Mac OS 8.5 or later
- 64Mb RAM or more recommende for best performance
- 32Mb RAM minimal to run low-resolution version
- 16Mb available disk space
- Monitor resolution of 800x600

Windows
- Pentium II
- CD-Rom player (12x speed)
- 64Mb RAM or more recommende for best performance
- 32Mb RAM minimal to run low-resolution version
- 16Mb available disk space
- Monitor resolution of 800x600
Greek Textbooks of Prose Composition and Rhetoric
Editor: George Kennedy
The progymnasmata were fundamental to the teaching of prose composition and elementary rhetoric in European schools from the Hellenistic period to early modern times. George A. Kennedy, one of the world’s leading scholars of ancient rhetoric, provides in this volume an English translation of four Greek treatises written during the time of the Roman empire but studied throughout the Roman and Byzantine periods—works attributed to Theon, Hermogenes, Aphthonius, and Nicolaus. Also included in this important volume are translations of the fragments of Sopatros’ treatise as well as John of Sardis’ commentary on these exercises. Several of these works have never before been translated into English and are here made accessible to the general reader for the first time. The curriculum described in these works provided basic training in oral and written expression, but also inculcated cultural values and an understanding of the conventional literary forms—fable, narrative, chreia, ecphrasis, comparison, and so on—that were the building blocks of the epics, dramas, histories, and lyric poetry characteristic of the Greco-Roman period. The habits of thinking and writing learned in schools using the progymnasmata molded not only the secular literature of the Greeks and Romans, but also the writings of the early Christians through the patristic period.

Paperback edition available from the Society of Biblical Literature (www.sbl-site.org).
From the Coming of Islam to the Ottoman Period
Editor: Hugh Kennedy
Crusader castles have been the subject of academic study for well over a century but the castles constructed by Muslim powers in greater Syria have been comparatively neglected. This series of studies looks at key developments and monuments in the history of Muslim military architecture in Syria from its beginnings under the Umayyads (661-750) down to Ottoman times. These studies range from ground-breaking archaeological studies to wide-ranging analysis of broader trends. The work is fully illustrated with photographs and plans, most of them never published before.
Two Rhetorical Treatises from the Hermogenic Corpus
Author: George Kennedy
Witi Ihimaera and New Zealand’s Literary Traditions
Author: Melissa Kennedy
Striding Both Worlds illuminates European influences in the fiction of Witi Ihimaera, Aotearoa New Zealand’s foremost Māori writer, in order to question the common interpretation of Māori writing as displaying a distinctive Māori world-view and literary style. Far from being discrete endogenous units, all cultures and literatures arise out of constant interaction, engagement, and even friction. Thus, Māori culture since the 1970s has been shaped by a long history of interaction with colonial British, Pakeha, and other postcolonial and indigenous cultures. Māori sovereignty and renaissance movements have harnessed the structures of European modernity, nation-building, and, more recently, Western global capitalism, transculturation, and diaspora – contexts which contest New Zealand bicultural identity, encouraging Māori to express their difference and self-sufficiency.
Ihimaera’s fiction has been largely viewed as embodying the specific values of Māori renaissance and biculturalism. However, Ihimaera, in his techniques, modes, and themes, is indebted to a wider range of literary influences than national literary critique accounts for. In taking an international literary perspective, this book draws critical attention to little-known or disregarded aspects such as Ihimaera’s love of opera, the extravagance of his baroque lyricism, his exploration of fantasy, and his increasing interest in taking Māori into the global arena. In revealing a broad range of cultural and aesthetic influences and inter-references commonly seen as irrelevant to contemporary Māori literature, Striding Both Worlds argues for a hitherto frequently overlooked and undervalued depth and complexity to Ihimaera’s imaginary.
The present study argues that an emphasis on difference tends to lose sight of fiction’s capacity to appreciate originality and individuality in the polyphony of its very form and function. In effect, literary negotiation of Māori sovereign space takes place in its forms rather than in its content: the uniqueness of Māori literature is found in the way it uses the common tools of literary fiction, including language, imagery, the text’s relationship to reality, and the function of characterization. By interpeting aspects of Ihimaera’s oeuvre for what they share with other literatures in English, Striding Both Worlds aims to present an additional, complementary approach to Māori, New Zealand, and postcolonial literary analysis.
Editors: Kennedy and Louscher
The focus of this book is on the interaction between the civilian government and the military in Asian and African countries. The authors have gone to great lengths to provide an accurate analysis of both the advantages and the shortcomings of the respective countries' attempts to reach civil - military cooperation.
Each article provides the reader with the information necessary to make a preliminary judgement on the efficiency of the given country's ability to achieve harmony between their government and their military.