Search Results

Resisting the Esprit de Corps

White Challenging Whiteness

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Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner

Conclusion

Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College

Hillary B. Eisworth and Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner

#BRokenPromises, Black Deaths, & Blue Ribbons

Understanding, Complicating, and Transcending Police-Community Violence

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Edited by Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Kerri J. Tobin and Stephen M. Lentz

Many urban centres are shaken to their core with mistrust between communities and law enforcement. Erosion was exacerbated in the Obama-era, intensified during the 2016 campaign, and is violently manifested in Trump’s presidency. The promise of uniting communities articulated by leaders lays broken. The text suggests that promise of prosperous and engaged urban citizenry will remain broken until we can honestly address the following unanswered questions: What factors contribute to the creation of divided communities? What happened to erode trust between community and law enforcement? What concerns and challenges do law enforcement officials have relating to policing within urban centres? What are the experiences of residents and police? And, finally, whose lives really matter, and how do we move forward?

Contributors are: Lawrence Baines, Amber C. Bryant, Erica L. Bumpers, Issac Carter, Justin A. Cole, Erin Dreeszen, Jaquial Durham, Antonio Ellis, Idara Essien, Jeffrey M. Frank, Beatriz Gonzalez, Aaron J. Griffen, Jennie L. Hanna, Diane M. Harnek Hall, Cleveland Hayes, Deanna Hayes-Wilson, Stacey Hill, Jim L. Hollar, Taharee A. Jackson, Melinda Jackson-Jefferson, Sharon D. Jones-Eversley, Stephen M. Lentz, Patricia Maloney, Isiah Marshall, Jr., Derrick McKisick, Rebecca Neal, Ariel Quinio, Jacqueline M. Rhoden-Trader, Derrick Robinson, Ebony B. Rose, Randa Suleiman, Clarice Thomas, Kerri J. Tobin, Eddie Vanderhorst, Rolanda L. Ward, Deondra Warner, John Williams, Deleon M. Wilson, Geoffrey L. Wood, Jemimah L. Young, and Jie Yu.

Repositioning the Hook

(Re)committing to Equity Through Autoethnographic Exploration

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Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Margaret-Mary Sulentic Dowell, Dana L. Bickmore and Steven Bickmore

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Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Rema E. Reynolds, Katrice A. Albert and Lori L. Martin

Introduction

Writing Wrongs in Post-Racial American Justice

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Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Lori L. Martin, Katrice A. Albert and Rema E. Reynolds

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Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Rema E. Reynolds, Katrice A. Albert and Lori L. Martin

Through the Fire – From Intake to Credential

Teacher Candidates Share Their Experiences through Narrative

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Cleveland Hayes, Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Hillary B. Eisworth and Kimberly White-Smith

By applying an auto-ethnographic approach in this volume to share and explore the experiences of prospective teachers as they navigate the preparation and credentialing processes of teacher education, we – as those who have gone before the future educators in this text and those who will come behind them, gain first hand insights from these young women and men about what it means and how to better prepare prospective educators to become a teacher against a backdrop of historical inequities in schooling and prepared for the multi-culturally diverse classrooms of today. Teacher educators, school and community leaders, and others committed to pushing toward more equitable social domains and forms of living and learning hence would do well to take up the opportunity provided in this text to learn from the narratives included in this volume and those of other teacher candidates; indeed, the narratives of teacher candidates herein and elsewhere are, in part, reflections of ourselves as teacher educators and evaluations of our work in teacher education and the professional preparation of those who will carry on our professions after us and for rising generations. What we as teacher educators teach, or think we are teaching, in teacher preparation courses may, or may not, be what prospective teachers are learning about being a teacher and successful teaching and learning for all learners, particularly those students historically underserved.

Each of the prospective educators who share their narratives in this volume are striving to become critical educators capable of promoting equitable educational and social opportunities, outcomes, and experiences for all learners. While their journeys are each distinctive and unique to them personally, the teacher candidates who share their narratives in this volume highlight some of the challenges and opportunities they have encountered in teacher preparation courses to learn about the functioning of social structures that sustain society’s existing hierarchies and develop the skills and knowledge requisite to identify, implement, and assess critical learning strategies aimed at challenging inequities and promoting more inclusive forms of education. Specifically, these future teachers included in this volume are sharing with us, their readers, their attempts at learning to unhook from Whiteness and to disrupt the pernicious and historical school-to-prison pipeline that has long existed in the US between the nation’s prison system and schools serving learners and their families and communities identified as racially not White, economically poor, and otherwise not members of the White, middle-class, primary English speaking, heterosexual, patriarchal mainstream.

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Edited by Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, Rema E. Reynolds, Katrice A. Albert and Lori Latrice Martin

Trayvon Martin, Race, and “American Justice”: Writing Wrong is the first comprehensive text to analyze not only the killing of Trayvon Martin, but the implications of this event for the state of race in the United States. Bringing together contributions from a variety of disciplines and approaches, this text pushes readers to answer the question: “In the wake of the killing of Trayvon Martin, and the acquittal of his killer, how post-racial can we claim to be?” This collection of short and powerful chapters is at times angering and at times hopeful, but always thought provoking, critical, and poignant. This interdisciplinary volume is well suited for undergraduate and graduate students as well as faculty in sociology, social work, law, communication, and education. This book can also be read by anyone interested in social justice and equity through the lens of race in the 21st century.

Student Teaching

A Journey in Narratives

Edited by Kenneth J. Fasching-Varner, H.B. Eisworth, T.H. Mencer, D.R. Lindbom-Cho, M.C. Murray and B.C. Morton

The journey of becoming a teacher is a complicated, emotional, and often intricate endeavor. Much has been written about pre-service teachers but rarely do we understand the journey through their own voices. Join nine pre-service teachers as they share their experiences, challenges, and victories through a series of powerful narratives. Committed to making the process more transparent for those embarking on a similar journey, the chapter authors share honest, personal, and heartfelt viewpoints about what it means to become a teacher. The nine pre-service teachers in this volume all participated in a yearlong student teaching in the renowned Elementary Holmes Master of Arts in Teaching program at Louisiana State University. Putting to practice critical perspectives about what it means to teach in the 21st century, these authors expose their vulnerabilities with a range of literary approaches including metaphor, reflective journaling, and storytelling. The volume is framed by teacher educator insights about the contexts and complexities of teaching. A must read for anyone preparing to student teach, or for those already student teaching, Student Teaching: A Journey in Narratives deals directly with the realities of learning to teach.
Sometimes poetic, sometimes painful, these compelling personal narratives of novice teachers provide a poignant view of the struggles, fears, and celebrations developing teachers traverse on the journey to induction into the profession. Teacher educators and teacher candidates alike will find much to explore and discuss in these chapters. No stone of learning to teach is left unturned!—Lisa Delpit, Author of Other People’s Children: Cultural Conflict in the Classroom and Multiplication is for White People: Raising Expectations for Other People’s Children