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In: Society & Animals
In: Society & Animals
In: Society & Animals
In: Society & Animals
In: Society & Animals
In: Society & Animals
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Abstract

The present study of the psychology of animal rights activists utilizes a qualitative analytic method based on two forms of data: a set of questionnaire protocols completed by grassroots activists and of autobiographical accounts by movement leaders. The resultant account keys on the following descriptives: (1) an attitude of caring, (2) suffering as an habitual object of perception, and (3) the aggressive and skillful uncovering and investigation of instances of suffering. In a final section, the investigator discusses tensions and conflicts arising from these three themes and various ways of attempting to resolve them.

In: Society & Animals
Author:

Abstract

This is the third in a series of reports on the state of the field of Human-Animal Studies. In the introductory section, major terms in the prevailing definition of the field—Human-Animal Studies is the interdisciplinary study of human-animal relationships—are unpacked and critically analyzed. Subsequent sections deal with the field’s past, present, and possible futures. A schematic history of the field considers both scholarly contributions and programmatic inroads in the academy. The current state of the field section describes its breadth in terms of publication venues, disciplines that interface with it, and the variety of methods employed. It also offers a description of several common strategies that critique the received view of the categorical divide between human and other animal beings. The final section highlights both the potential of and anticipated roadblocks to each of several future trajectories.

Open Access
In: Society & Animals
Author:

Abstract

Reframing atheism as a set of positive beliefs, I describe a way of living in the world in which atheism requires faith, defined as a commitment to beliefs that are both logically and empirically not subject to proof. Faithful atheists have faith in and take spiritual nourishment from being in the presence of a world which is awesome and wonderful both in that it is immediately available and that it is and will always remain at least partly opaque to understanding. They do so without positing a God or inflating the reach of reason. Their way of living is characterized by “sensational presence” (full attention to and staying with a present moment) and the courage to accept that their access and understanding whether in relation to other people, other animals, and nature more generally, is always limited. This inherent residual opacity grounds their respect and sense of mystery in each of these realms.

In: Worldviews: Global Religions, Culture, and Ecology