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  • Author or Editor: Kerstin Schmidt x
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Abstract

This essay looks at the ways in which the still powerful allure of documentary photography to serve as proof and authentic documentation has been called into question by the photographic practice of Stan Douglas and James Casebere. Douglas’s reconstructed settings in his seriesDisco Angola and Casebere’s miniature constructs of New England landscapes or his easily recognizable uncanny interiors of famous cultural places such as Monticello or Sing Sing penitentiary have intricately subverted documentary photography’s role in the representation of the places we live in. I will show how documentary photography’s evidentiary power has been undermined by the openly fictitious nature of Douglas’s and Casebere’s images, making us rethink the possibilities of the documentation, perception as well as representation of place in photography. Instead of allegedly photographing reality, these images of places evoke only shifting, evasive relations to the real, that is to the places of the world that we can only conceive of in fugitive images.

In: Picturing America
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Abstract

This essay looks at the ways in which the still powerful allure of documentary photography to serve as proof and authentic documentation has been called into question by the photographic practice of Stan Douglas and James Casebere. Douglas’s reconstructed settings in his seriesDisco Angola and Casebere’s miniature constructs of New England landscapes or his easily recognizable uncanny interiors of famous cultural places such as Monticello or Sing Sing penitentiary have intricately subverted documentary photography’s role in the representation of the places we live in. I will show how documentary photography’s evidentiary power has been undermined by the openly fictitious nature of Douglas’s and Casebere’s images, making us rethink the possibilities of the documentation, perception as well as representation of place in photography. Instead of allegedly photographing reality, these images of places evoke only shifting, evasive relations to the real, that is to the places of the world that we can only conceive of in fugitive images.

In: Picturing America
Postmodernism in American Drama
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The Theater of Transformation: Postmodernism in American Drama offers a fresh and innovative reading of the contemporary experimental American theater scene and navigates through the contested and contentious relationship between postmodernism and contemporary drama. This book addresses gender and class as well as racial issues in the context of a theoretical discussion of dramatic texts, textuality, and performance. Transformation is contemporary drama's answer to the questions of postmodernism and a major technique in the development of a postmodern language for the stage. In order to demonstrate the multi-faceted nature of the postmodern theater of transformation, this study draws on a wide range of plays: from early experimental plays of the 1960s by Jean-Claude van Itallie through feminist plays by Megan Terry and Rochelle Owens to more recent drama by the African-American playwright Suzan-Lori Parks.
The Theater of Transformation: Postmodernism in American Drama is written for anyone interested in contemporary American drama and theater as well as in postmodernism and contemporary literary theory. It appeals even more broadly to a readership intrigued by the ubiquitous aspects of popular culture, by feminism and ethnicity, and by issues pertaining to the so-called 'society of spectacle' and the study of contemporary media.
In: Space in America
In: The Theater of Transformation
In: The Theater of Transformation
In: The Theater of Transformation
In: The Theater of Transformation
In: The Theater of Transformation