Towards the Rule of Law
Author: Keyuan Zou
China’s legal system has drawn ever more attention from the international community. It has been developing at a very significant pace since China carried out economic reform and instituted an “open door” policy in 1978.China’s entry into the World Trade Organization (WTO) has had a tremendous impact on the development and reform of China’s legal system. This book focuses on the recent developments of China’s legal system as well as its reform in the context of globalization. It covers various hot and timely topics, including constitutional changes, the relationship between the Chinese Communist Party and the law, legislation, law-based administration, laws for anti-corruption campaigns, judicial reform, legal education and China’s compliance with international law. The book is suitable for lawyers, whether practicing or academic, officials in national governments and international organizations and students and scholars in academia, who are interested in China, Chinese law, comparative and international law.
Editor: Zou Keyuan
The concept of sustainable development is created to coordinate the relationship between resource uses and environmental protection. Environmental protection is necessary to achieve the goal of sustainable resource uses and economic benefits deriving from resources can provide the conditions in which environmental protection can best be achieved. Sustainable Development and the Law of the Sea offers international legal perspectives on ocean uses including fisheries management, sustainable use of marine non-living resources, and marine protected areas in the context of sustainable development. Pushing that sustainability is a requirement for ocean use as well as for the establishment and development of the world marine legal order, the volume provides a useful reference for policy-makers and the international legal community and for all those interested in ocean governance.
Editor: Keyuan Zou
Maritime Cooperation in Semi-Enclosed Seas, edited by Keyuan Zou, brings together distinguished scholars to discuss how and to what extent Article 123 of the LOSC has been implemented in state practice in East Asia and Europe, and what kind of existing experiences can be observed and lessons drawn so as to promote maritime cooperation in semi-enclosed seas. An interdisciplinary approach has been taken to broaden the scope of discussion on how to strengthen the implementation of the LOSC.
The book is divided into four parts: “International Legal Framework for Semi-Enclosed Seas Cooperation,” “Cooperative Management of Marine Resources,” “Handling Non-Traditional Security Issues,” and “New Challenges to Semi-Enclosed Seas Cooperation.” In addition to general discussions on semi-enclosed seas, the volume offers special geographic coverage of the East China Sea and South China Sea in East Asia and the North Sea and Mediterranean Sea in Europe.
Editor: Keyuan Zou
'Global Commons’ refers to resource domains or areas that lie outside of the political reach of any one State, including sea areas beyond national jurisdiction and Antarctica. The concept of ‘global commons’ is a living concept and can accommodate, over time, other commons at the international level, such as biodiversity and generic resources. The outlook for the global marine commons is not encouraging: fishery resources continue to deplete, marine biodiversity continues to reduce, and plastic wastes in the oceans continue to increase. In international law, there are legal regimes governing global marine commons, the most important of which is the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOSC). Effective as of 1994 LOSC governs the high seas, international seabed and its resources, marine environmental protection, and fisheries.

Global Commons and the Law of the Sea offers intellectual discussions on global marine commons. It contains six parts respectively addressing the principle of the common heritage of mankind (CHM), freedoms of high seas, deep sea mining and international seabed, area beyond national jurisdiction (ABNJ) governance, management of geoengineering and generic resources, and recent developments in the polar regions.
Author: Keyuan Zou
Being one of the largest coastal States in the world, China’s marine legal system is significant in the overall development of the international law of the sea. This book focuses on the establishment and development of China’s marine legal system in the context of the new law of the sea centered on the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, which China ratified in 1996. It consists of five parts concerning, respectively, a general survey of China’s marine legal system, navigation and maritime security, marine resources management, marine environmental protection and marine scientific research. China’s basic marine laws and regulations are discussed and assessed in detail throughout the book.
The book is of interest to lawyers, whether practicing or academic, officials in national governments and international organizations and students and scholars in academia, who are interested in international law, international relations and ocean affairs.
Editor: Keyuan Zou
In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
Author: ZOU Keyuan

Abstract

The Charter of the United Nations designates the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) as one of the principal organs of the United Nations, assuming the “primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security”. It has the power to determine the existence of any threat to the peace, breach of the peace, or act of aggression, to make recommendations, and decide what measures should be taken to maintain or restore international peace and security. This article addresses a number of issues concerning how the UNSC Resolutions are enforced at sea in accordance with applicable international law and makes special reference to the circumstances in East Asia, particularly the Korean Peninsula.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
Author: Zou Keyuan

Abstract

China's traditional maritime boundary line, commonly known as the U-shaped line in the South China Sea, has been queried frequently in various circles, whether governmental or academic, on its real meaning. This article addresses the legal implications of this line for the Spratly Islands dispute, including, inter alia, the origin and evolution of the line, China's attitude towards and practice relating to the line, reactions from other South China Sea countries, the relevance of the line to the concept of historic waters and other law of the sea concepts, and the potential role to be played by the line in the future delimitation of maritime boundaries in the South China Sea.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law
Author: Zou Keyuan

Abstract

The Taiwan Strait is a critical corridor connecting the East China Sea to the South China Sea. The divided status of China as a result of the civil war in 1949 has made the situation in the Taiwan Strait complicated and uncertain. After the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOS), the legal status of the Taiwan Strait has been changed from a strait embodying high seas waters to a strait only with waters under national jurisdiction of China. The waters within the Strait may be divided into several sea zones in accordance with the LOS Convention, i.e., the internal waters, territorial sea and EEZ/continental shelf. Due to the difference among the sea zones, the navigational waterways within the Taiwan Strait are subject to different legal rules. Thus cross-Strait co-operation between mainland China and Taiwan is necessary to manage the Taiwan Strait and human activities therein.

In: The International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law