Author: Kipp Davis
The Cave 4 Apocryphon of Jeremiah C from Qumran survives in several copies, and presents significant links between the prophet Jeremiah, the scriptural book of Jeremiah, and the collectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Because the prophet is only occasionally named in the Scrolls, and there are only a few clear instances where the book is cited, Jeremiah appears to have had a limited impact on the imagination of the Qumranites. However, through a careful appraisal of the Apocryphon manuscripts, and a reconsideration of Jeremiah's influence in the Dead Sea Scrolls via his reputational authority, this study shows that clusters of traditions were tied to Jeremiah’s prophetic and priestly distinction, with an emphasis on matters of leadership and empire.
Author: Kipp Davis

Abstract

This essay examines continuities and discontinuities between Apocryphal Baruch and the Qumran Apocryphon of Jeremiah C, and attempts to situate these texts relative to one another and within their shared social matrix. Special attention is paid to their specific usage of scripture, their respective interpretations of the Babylonian exile, their implied understanding of efficacious Jewish religious practice in the second and first centuries B.C.E., and how these were further reflected in the reputation of their protagonists: the prophet Jeremiah, and his scribal companion Baruch.

In: Journal for the Study of Judaism
In: The Cave 4 Apocryphon of Jeremiah and the Qumran Jeremianic Traditions
In: The Cave 4 Apocryphon of Jeremiah and the Qumran Jeremianic Traditions
In: The Cave 4 Apocryphon of Jeremiah and the Qumran Jeremianic Traditions
In: The Cave 4 Apocryphon of Jeremiah and the Qumran Jeremianic Traditions