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Author: Kirsteen Kim

Abstract

In recent years in the West missiology, or mission studies, has often been subsumed into other disciplines. Inter alia, it has been absorbed by theological disciplines such as practical theology and intercultural theology. Although because of colonial and fundamentalist associations, mission is a contentious term; this chapter will argue that nevertheless the critical study of mission has much to offer to theology and other disciplines. However, this potential is lost in such unions.

To make this case, the chapter will revisit some of the arguments about the integration of the imc into the wcc in 1961, together with discussions about church and parachurch in the Lausanne Movement. First, it will ask whether theological arguments about the missional nature of the church justify a loss of autonomy of missiology. Second, it will also question whether cultural and religious studies cover the same ground as missiology. Third, it will argue that missiology has a distinctive constituency that is not only white, a view of history that is not easily encompassed within church history, unique doctrinal insights, and a global perspective. For these strengths to be realised, missiology requires some autonomy. Furthermore, a measure of independence will allow missiology to play a much-needed critical role vis-à-vis theology.

In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity
Author: Kirsteen Kim

Abstract

In recent years in the West missiology, or mission studies, has often been subsumed into other disciplines. Inter alia, it has been absorbed by theological disciplines such as practical theology and intercultural theology. Although because of colonial and fundamentalist associations, mission is a contentious term; this chapter will argue that nevertheless the critical study of mission has much to offer to theology and other disciplines. However, this potential is lost in such unions.

To make this case, the chapter will revisit some of the arguments about the integration of the imc into the wcc in 1961, together with discussions about church and parachurch in the Lausanne Movement. First, it will ask whether theological arguments about the missional nature of the church justify a loss of autonomy of missiology. Second, it will also question whether cultural and religious studies cover the same ground as missiology. Third, it will argue that missiology has a distinctive constituency that is not only white, a view of history that is not easily encompassed within church history, unique doctrinal insights, and a global perspective. For these strengths to be realised, missiology requires some autonomy. Furthermore, a measure of independence will allow missiology to play a much-needed critical role vis-à-vis theology.

In: Ecumenism and Independency in World Christianity
Author: Kirsteen Kim

Abstract

Korean Christianity is known around the world for its amazing growth and dynamism, and this includes a thriving theological life, much of which is inaccessible without knowledge of the Korean language. Ryu Tong-Shik (Yu Tong-shik) was one of the first Koreans to attempt to trace the development of Korean theology in his seminal work, Han'guk shinhak-ŭi kwangmaek (The Mineral Veins of Korean Theology; first published 1982). This paper introduces Ryu's theological thought and investigates a particular observation he makes about two distinct patterns of Holy Spirit move-ment in the Korean church, which he designates 'paternal' and 'maternal' and identifies both before and after the liberation from Japan in 1945. The paper examines the grounds of Ryu's claim, which derive from the religious history of Korea, and suggests the relevance of this schema to other societies and to pneumatological reflection in general.

In: Exchange
In: Mission Studies
In: Mission Studies
In: Mission Studies
In: Mission Studies
In: Mission Studies
In: Mission Studies